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Although I've been writing Ruby for a while now, I'm always looking for ways to improve my style.

I've grown accustomed to a particularly short, succinct method of instantiating + appending to an array:

ruby-1.9.3-p194 :001 > (a ||= []) << 1
 => [1] 

This particular syntax seems valid only when used in conjunction with Arrays, as my attempts to do this with other types return syntax errors.

ruby-1.9.3-p194 :002 > (i ||= 0) += 1
SyntaxError: (irb):2: syntax error, unexpected tOP_ASGN, expecting $end

(i ||= 0) += 1
            ^
from /usr/local/rvm/rubies/ruby-1.9.3-p194/bin/irb:16:in `<main>'

And, also with strings, although I pretty much expected this to not work given the prior experiment.

ruby-1.9.3-p194 :003 > (s ||= '') += 'TEST'
SyntaxError: (irb):3: syntax error, unexpected tOP_ASGN, expecting $end

(s ||= '') += 'TEST'
             ^
from /usr/local/rvm/rubies/ruby-1.9.3-p194/bin/irb:16:in `<main>'

What is it here that differentiates an Array from other types when this syntax form is used?

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1  
Aside, you might like this –  Zabba Oct 14 '12 at 6:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In Ruby, like in most other languages as well, abbreviated assignments are simply syntactic sugar for the expanded form, i.e.

a += b

is syntactic sugar for

a = a + b

So,

(i ||= 0) += 1

is syntactic sugar for

(i ||= 0) = (i ||= 0) + 1

which is simply illegal.

This has absolutely nothing to do with arrays, as you can see here:

(s ||= '') << 'TEST' # works

(a ||= []) += [1]    # doesn't work
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1  
Is it possible that (i ||= 0) returns a value which isn't considered a reference to i or is this really the case with the Ruby interpreter? –  GeReV Oct 14 '12 at 4:20
1  
If (i ||= 0) += 1 is syntactic sugar for (i ||= 0) = (i ||= 0) + 1, why is i += 1 (which errors if i is nil) not the same as i ||= 0; i += 1? I feel like I'm still not completely understanding how this bit of syntax is interpreted. –  Adam Eberlin Oct 14 '12 at 4:46
    
i += 1 would translate to i = i + 1, which is an error if i is nil. –  Zabba Oct 14 '12 at 6:06
    
a ||= b is treated special. It's the only abbreviated assignment operator that doesn't follow the simple translation rule. I left it out of my answer since it isn't relevant to the problem you are seeing in your question. –  Jörg W Mittag Oct 14 '12 at 22:03

The left side has to be a variable. How about:

i = (i || 0) + 1

or

i = i ? i + 1 : 1
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You can use these guarded statements for anything that provides an operation that will change the state of the variable, e.g. concat for String, << for Array, etc.

1.9.2p290 :111 > s = nil
 => nil 
1.9.2p290 :112 > (s ||= '').concat 'test'
 => "test" 
1.9.2p290 :113 > (s ||= '').concat 'test'
 => "testtest" 

For some types such as FixNum you don't really have an option as you can't change the state without an assignment so the nearest thing we could have is succ, but as you can see it doesn't update the stored value

1.9.2p290 :130 > i = nil
 => nil 
1.9.2p290 :131 > (i || 0).succ
 => 1 
1.9.2p290 :132 > (i || 0).succ
 => 1 

For such types, I recommend Jörg W Mittag's suggestion of i = (i || 0) + 1 as it's quite clean and portrays it's purpose well

1.9.2p290 :134 > i = nil
 => nil 
1.9.2p290 :135 > i = (i || 0) + 1
 => 1 
1.9.2p290 :136 > i = (i || 0) + 1
 => 2 
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