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Made this 2D water demo a couple of months ago(http://nauful.com/Qasim/Pani.html), and it's got this core rendering function called waveHandler that's constantly called(ENTER_FRAME).

There's a bunch of image processing displacementMap/convolution stuff going on in here, but that's not really relevant. I want to modify the stuff going on in this waveHandler function, but I don't want to have an IF statement that constantly runs in here. For example, there's this faux post-processing bloom/reflectivity stuff that's going on that tends to bog down on older machines(pressing ~ shows the FPS counter), and I'd like to have an option that enables/disables it, without having an IF statement constantly checks some boolean variable's value.

Off the top of my head, one highly unelegant and verbose way to do this would be to have multiple versions of waveHandler handling the permutations of those options, and then remove one version's listener and enable another. But how do I do this properly?

Also, is it possible to have variables "point to" functions? So, if var asdf:Function points to one function at one time, and then asdf's value is changed to point to a different function, the main function could call whatever function asdf pointed to, without having a conditional statement checked constantly.

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

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The fastest would be the one you suggested: having one waveHandler for each permutation of the options. It will be the fastest when the options are enabled and the fastest when options are disabled.

Another approach you suggested yourself: Having references to the functions and change the reference to enable or disable an option. And we can "disable" by changing the reference to point to an empty function. Something like this:

package {
    import flash.display.Sprite;
    import flash.utils.getTimer;

    public class Main extends Sprite {
        private var call1: Function;
        private var call2: Function;
        private var call3: Function;

        public function Main() : void {
            var doOption1 : Boolean = true;
            var doOption2 : Boolean = false;
            var doOption3 : Boolean = true;

            call1 = doOption1 ? option1 : empty;
            call2 = doOption2 ? option2 : empty;
            call3 = doOption3 ? option3 : empty;

            onEnterFrame();
        }

        private function onEnterFrame():void {
            call1();
            call2();
            call3();
        }

        private function option1():void {
            trace("option1");
        }

        private function option2():void {
            trace("option2");
        }

        private function option3():void {
            trace("option3");
        }

        private function empty():void {
        }
    }
}

This will not give you any penalty in performance when an option is enabled, but you will get a penalty when an option is disabled compared to the first solution since you're calling an empty function, so you get that small overhead.

I know this whole question might have been more of a an academic type, and you already know it won't really make any noticeable difference in performance.

But it sounds like you think an if case is worse than it is from a performance point of view. I would just stick with them (because they result in quite readable code) and focus on optimizing parts of your code where you can make a measurable impact.

I just made a simple test to give you an idea how insignificant a few boolean checks are. I have two different onEnterFrame functions. Both call an empty function ten times. The first one is "plain" (just ten successive calls). The other checks that a flag is true before each call to the method.

On my pretty standard laptop the first result came out like this:

Plain: 3133 ms
With if checks: 3167 ms
Difference for 1000000 onEnterFrame calls: 34 ms
Difference per onEnterFrame call: 0.000034 ms

The difference is so small that it's hard to measure even when you make a million calls (in some test runs after the first run the version with the if checks was actually faster).

This is just a long winded way of saying that when it comes to optimization you really should take a more scientific approach because otherwise you end up spending a lot of time trying to make optimizations but instead just end up making the code harder to read and maintain with little to no improvement in speed. Been here done that :-)

Finally, here's the test if you want to run it for yourself:

package {
    import flash.display.Sprite;
    import flash.utils.getTimer;

    public class Main extends Sprite {
        private var m_flag: Boolean = true;

        public function Main() : void {
            var callCount : int = 1000000, time1 : int, time2 : int, i : int;

            i = callCount;
            time1 = getTimer();
            while (i-- > 0) {
                onEnterFrame1();
            }
            time1 = (getTimer() - time1);

            i = callCount;
            time2 = getTimer();
            while (i-- > 0) {
                onEnterFrame2();
            }
            time2 = (getTimer() - time2);

            trace("Plain: " + time1 + " ms");
            trace("With if checks: " + time2 + " ms");
            trace("Difference for " + callCount + " onEnterFrame calls: " + (time2 - time1) + " ms");
            trace("Difference per onEnterFrame call:  " + ((time2 - time1) / callCount) + " ms");
        }

        private function onEnterFrame1():void {
            emptyMethod();
            emptyMethod();
            emptyMethod();
            emptyMethod();
            emptyMethod();
            emptyMethod();
            emptyMethod();
            emptyMethod();
            emptyMethod();
            emptyMethod();
        }

        private function onEnterFrame2():void {
            if (m_flag) emptyMethod();
            if (m_flag) emptyMethod();
            if (m_flag) emptyMethod();
            if (m_flag) emptyMethod();
            if (m_flag) emptyMethod();
            if (m_flag) emptyMethod();
            if (m_flag) emptyMethod();
            if (m_flag) emptyMethod();
            if (m_flag) emptyMethod();
            if (m_flag) emptyMethod();
        }

        private function emptyMethod():void {
        }
    }
}
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@Vesper Both of you guys, thank you for your detailed and insightful replies. Appreciate it. I really thought adding conditionals would be more costly. –  Qasim Oct 15 '12 at 3:50

The latter is certainly possible, but you can't put that variable into an addEventListener call. But, you can do like this:

function onEnterFrame(e:Event):void {
    if (asdf) asdf();
}

And set your asdf variable to point to correct function. But take care, you should not use this approach to functions that are not uniform in argument set, say one function has one int argument, and another zero arguments - that would throw an exception.

But given your conditions, I'd go with boolean if statements, because checking a boolean once is even less expensive than calling a function through a variable.

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Thank you for your input! Could you elaborate on that a bit - can asdf() point to entirely different functions though, as long as asdf() isn't called in an addEventListener() call AND whatever function/s asdf points to, accept the same arguments? –  Qasim Oct 14 '12 at 5:06
    
In short, yes. And, it can be called from anywhere, a function is designed to work like this. You cannot pass a variable to addEventListener, hoping it to magically change whenever you alter the variable's contents, but you can pass a variable to addEventListener having a currently assigned function to become a listener. In all other cases, you can easily call asdf() from a statically assigned listener if you pass the correct number of arguments for the referenced function. –  Vesper Oct 14 '12 at 12:18

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