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I have the code below which compiles fine in xcode, but when I take it across to Microsoft Visual studio I get a bunch of errors.

    void openfile(int mapArray[MAX_HEIGHT][MAX_WIDTH], int *interest, int *dimension1, int *dimension2)
    { 
    int counter = 0;
    char buffer;
    int rowss, colss;
    *interest = 0;

    FILE *f;
    f = fopen(FILENAME, "r");
    if (f==NULL) {
            printf("Map file could not be opened");
            return 0;
    }


    // create char array the dimensions of the map
    fscanf(f, "%d %d" , dimension1, dimension2 );
    // printf("%d %d\n" , dimensions[0], dimensions[1]);


    // Reads the spaces at the end of the line till the map starts
    buffer=fgetc(f);
    while (buffer!='*') {
            buffer=fgetc(f);
    }

    // Read the txt file and print it out while storing it in a char array
    while (buffer!=EOF) {

            mapArray[rowss][colss]=buffer;

            colss++;

            // Count up the points of interest
            if (((buffer>64)&&(buffer<90))||(buffer=='@') ) {
                                    counter++;

                            }

            // resets column counter to zero after newline
            if (buffer=='\n') {
                    colss=0;
                    rowss++;
            }
            buffer=fgetc(f);
    }

    // Closes the file
    fclose(f);
    *interest=counter;

    }

Which parts are creating all the errors? I get this list of errors when attempting to compile

Thanks in advance.

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2  
Post that list of errors. We can narrow the problem down faster that way. –  nick_w Oct 14 '12 at 4:58

1 Answer 1

I see a few immediate problems. First, you're not initialising rowss or colss before you use them, hence they could contain any value.

Second, fgetc() returns an int so that you can detect end of file. By using a char to hold the return value, you're breaking the contract with the standard library.

Thirdly, you return a 0 if the filename couldn't be opened, despite the fact that the function is specified to return void (ie, nothing).

No doubt those are three of the errors the compiler picked up on, there may be others, and you should probably post the error list with your question for a more exhaustive analysis.

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I must have been using a post C98 or whatever compiler because almost all of my errors were due to initializing variables somewhere other than at the very beginning of main or the functions, thanks a lot for your help. –  user1744355 Oct 14 '12 at 5:44

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