Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
#include <stdio.h>
typedef struct {int a; int b; int c;} F;
typedef struct{
    int a;
    int (*ptr)(F*);
} A;

int set_a(F * obj){
    obj->a = 1;
}
int main(){
    F a;
    A b;
    b.a = 0;
    b.ptr = set_a;
    b.ptr(&a);
    printf("%d",a.a);

    getchar();
}

this seems correct

but why

#include <stdio.h>
typedef struct{
    int a;
    int (*ptr)(A*);
} A;

int set_a(A * obj){
    obj->a = 1;
}
int main(){
    A a;
    a.a = 0;
    a.ptr = set_a;
    a.ptr(&a);
    printf("%d",a.a);

    getchar();
}

this is incorrect? and

#include <stdio.h>
typedef struct{
    int a;
    int (*ptr)(A);
} A;

int set_a(A * obj){
    obj->a = 1;
}
int main(){
    A a;
    a.a = 0;
    a.ptr = set_a;
    a.ptr(&a);
    printf("%d",a.a);

    getchar();
}

this is correct? I really wonder thanks

environment Language C on Visual studio 2012 on Windows 7

share|improve this question
5  
They're all wrong, if only because of the fact that there's no documentation and your variable names are rubbish :-) –  paxdiablo Oct 14 '12 at 5:09
1  
@kim taeyun - please clarify: 1) what (if any) error message are you getting, 2) what exactly do you believe is "incorrect" and 3) what are you trying to do in the first place? –  paulsm4 Oct 14 '12 at 5:11
    
Could you change the title of the question to something more descriptive? –  Austin Henley Oct 14 '12 at 5:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In the 2nd and 3rd example you refer to A before (during) the declaration of it:

typedef struct{
    int a;
    int (*ptr)(A*); // < the compiler doesn't know A at this point.
} A;

Also, in the 3rd example, you declare ptr as function that receives A, but then assign it with set_a which receives A*, which is not valid as well.

You need to declare it before:

struct A;
typedef struct A{
    int a;
    int (*ptr)(struct A*);
} A;

In the first example you refer to F which already exists so it is OK.

share|improve this answer
    
why are you indulging the OP such a vaguely worded question??? At the very least, he should have included an error message and the corresponding line #. IMHO... –  paulsm4 Oct 14 '12 at 5:23
1  
@paulsm4 - maybe because it didn't seem that vague to me. The question could have been more elaborated, though. –  MByD Oct 14 '12 at 5:26
    
At the very least, the OP should have included an error message (e.g. error: 'A' has no member named 'ptr') and the corresponding line number. I think you did him a disservice by not asking for clarification. IMHO... –  paulsm4 Oct 14 '12 at 17:35
1  
look, I'm not the OP. Could this question be asked better? sure. Is it that bad to answer a question that should have been better asked? maybe. But it's not like a gave an answer when I didn't understand the question. –  MByD Oct 14 '12 at 17:41

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.