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I wanted to find out what perl -T means.

man perl says:

PERL(1)                               Perl Programmers Reference Guide                               PERL(1)

NAME
       perl - The Perl 5 language interpreter

SYNOPSIS
       perl [ -sTtuUWX ]      [ -hv ] [ -V[:configvar] ]
            [ -cw ] [ -d[t][:debugger] ] [ -D[number/list] ]
            [ -pna ] [ -Fpattern ] [ -l[octal] ] [ -0[octal/hexadecimal] ]
            [ -Idir ] [ -m[-]module ] [ -M[-]'module...' ] [ -f ]      [ -C [number/list] ]      [ -S ]
            [ -x[dir] ]      [ -i[extension] ]
            [ [-e|-E] 'command' ] [ -- ] [ programfile ] [ argument ]...

And then explains none of those command line arguments.

Where can I find a manpage/perldoc for those command line arguments?

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closed as not a real question by Ken White, talonmies, friedo, Bo Persson, Eng.Fouad Oct 16 '12 at 17:50

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
man perl lists all other perl-related manual pages. –  Serge Oct 14 '12 at 6:34
2  
Try the actual documentation, found with a 1 second Google search on perl documentation. –  Ken White Oct 14 '12 at 6:34
    
thank you guys. thanks to nneonneo for point out that perl command line arguments are in the 'perlrun' perldoc. –  user972946 Oct 14 '12 at 6:36
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Take a look at perldoc perlrun ("how to execute the Perl interpreter"):

-T

forces "taint" checks to be turned on so you can test them. Ordinarily these checks are done only when running setuid or setgid. It's a good idea to turn them on explicitly for programs that run on behalf of someone else whom you might not necessarily trust, such as CGI programs or any internet servers you might write in Perl. See perlsec for details. For security reasons, this option must be seen by Perl quite early; usually this means it must appear early on the command line or in the #! line for systems which support that construct.

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thank you very much. I read through the whole man perl page trying to find which perldoc could teach me the command line arguments... hahahaha well hidden perlrun. –  user972946 Oct 14 '12 at 6:47
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From the perldoc:

-T

turns on "taint" so you can test them. Ordinarily these checks are done only when running setuid or setgid. It's a good idea to turn them on explicitly for programs that run on behalf of someone else whom you might not necessarily trust, such as CGI programs or any internet servers you might write in Perl. See perlsec for details. For security reasons, this option must be seen by Perl quite early; usually this means it must appear early on the command line or in the #! line for systems which support that construct.

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