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I am writing a program to print out all the numbers from 0 to 100, and I need to find the number of digits a variable(in this case the variable counter) holds.

Here is my code:

SECTION .data
len EQU 32

SECTION .bss
counter resd len 
digit1 resd len
digit2 resd len
digit3 resd len

SECTION .text
GLOBAL _start
_start:
nop

Print:
mov eax, 4
mov ebx, 1
mov ecx, counter
mov edx, len
int 80h 

Set:
mov BYTE [counter], 1

Divide:
; HERE IS WHERE I NEED TO FIND THE LENGTH OF THE VARIABLE COUNTER
; initial division
mov ax, [counter]   ; number we want to print
mov ch, 10    ; we divide by ten to siphon digits
div ch        ; divide our number by 10

; al now has 11, ah has 1
mov dh, ah             ; save the remainder in dh
xor ah,ah
mov ch, 10             ; refill ch with the divisor
div ch                 ; al now has 1, ah now has 1

Move:                     ; now to move our digits to a printable state
mov [digit1], dh      ; first digit is in edx
mov [digit2], ah
mov [digit3], al

Adjust:
add BYTE [digit1], '0'
add BYTE [digit2], '0'
add BYTE [digit3], '0'

Print:
mov eax, 4
mov ebx, 1
mov ecx, digit1
mov edx, len
int 80h

mov eax, 4
mov ebx, 1
mov ecx, digit2
mov edx, len
int 80h

mov eax, 4
mov ebx, 1
mov ecx, digit3
mov edx, len
int 80h

Exit:
mov eax, 1
mov ebx, 0
int 80h

I need to find the length so that I know how many times to divide and also how many digits to print the variable counter.

How can I find how long it is?

Thanks in advance

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If it's just 0 to 100, why not do a test on x<10 and x<100? Then you don't have to calculate the whole thing out... –  nneonneo Oct 14 '12 at 7:17
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For numbers in the range 0..100, I'd just compare at the boundaries, with pseudo-assembler like:

    mov ax, [counter]

    mov cx, 3             ; default length
    cmp ax, 100           ; >= 100, use 3
    bge done

    dec cx                ; set length to 2
    cmp val, 10           ; >= 10, use 2
    bge done

    dec cx                ; set length to 1

done:
                          ; cx now holds the digit count.

That will actually handle up to 999 but you could also add more condition checks before the 100 one if you wanted to expand the range.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That works well. –  RileyH Oct 14 '12 at 7:46
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Aki HAS given an example! Compile it with the "-S" switch to see what a compiler does with it - although that may not help too much. :)

You ask how to figure out the number of digits. I've seen code (from the author of a well-known book!) that does an entire div loop until the quotient is zero just to count digits. Then he does another div loop to find 'em! Doing >10, > 100, >1000, etc. will work. But why do you need to know? You can just keep diving until the quotient is zero, and count digits. In fact, you can save a div (div is VERY slow!) by comparing the quotient to 9 - if be, your last digit is in al. Simpler to do the extra div, IMO. :)

We get the remainders/digits in the "wrong" order. I know of three ways to cope with this. What I think is "easiest" is to push 'em on the stack, counting them, and pop 'em off in the order we want to store/print them, adding '0' either before or after.

Another way is to start at the "back" of the buffer and work "forward". This is what Aki's ode does. For C-compatible code, returning a zero-terminated string is fine, but sys_write doesn't know about zero-terminated strings, it wants to know the length. (no problem, we can find the length of a "zstring") Note that this doesn't get to the beginning of the buffer. If you don't care about "C-compatible" code, you could return both "where we got to in the buffer" AND the length - perhaps in ecx and edx where sys_write wants 'em. Or you can space-pad to the beginning of the buffer. Right-justified numbers look nice printed in a column. :)

Still another way is to go ahead and put 'em in the buffer "backwards" and do a "reverse string" at the end.

None of these methods is very fast. div is slow, period! I "have" some code from Terje Mathieson (an expert at "speed of light" solutions) that doesn't use div but I don't understand it and don't use it. It can be found in various optimization manuals if you're in a hurry. :)

You're not gaining much by limiting yourself to 100. It's just as easy (perhaps easier) to write a routine using full 32-bit registers, and the CPU is comfortable with it. If you need to handle negative numbers, that's only a little more complicated. If you can't find examples around here, you can find some at the Nasm Forum, but it's an interesting exercise to try it yourself, as you're doing.

Uhh... look... Reserving "too much" memory may make your program "bloated", but won't do any harm. Reserving "not enough" memory is a bug! So you do well to err on the "too much" side. Still...

SECTION .data
len EQU 32

SECTION .bss
counter resd len 
digit1 resd len
digit2 resd len
digit3 resd len

... using a 128 byte buffer, and printing 32 bytes of it, for a single digit/character, seems like a lot. :)

Best, Frank

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Exactly. If you want to know the number of digits, you can either keep an internal counter, or subtract pointers. Anyway, I don't think one should care that much of the number of divisions in advance, as it really doesn't speed anything up. –  Aki Suihkonen Oct 14 '12 at 15:15
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Typically this is done with internal buffer (actually stack will do:)

You divide Y=X mod 10 (or Y=X mod base), X=X div base, until X=0 (and push each mod Y) Count the number of divisions, then pop each result from the stack C number of times and write to output stream.

void print_number(int eax, int ebx) {  // ebx = base, eax = number
   int ecx = 0;
   do {
      edx = eax % ebx;
      eax = eax / ebx;
      push(edx);
      ecx++;
   } while (eax);

   while (ecx) {
      pop (eax);
      putch(eax+'0');
      ecx--;
   }
}

The point is that you end up dividing exactly as many times you need to.

A slightly more optimized thing is [again in C to encourage your own thinking]...

void print_number(int a, int base) {
     char string[10];
     static *ptr = string+9;  // points to the last char of string
     *ptr--=0;                // write ending ASCII Zero.
     *ptr='0';
     while (a) {
          *--ptr= '0'+(a % base);  // works for base = 2-10
          a/=base;
     }
     printf("%s",ptr);
}

Can you find out why this works (or doesn't)?

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I don't quite understand what you mean. Could you give an example? –  RileyH Oct 14 '12 at 7:36
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