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I created sort of chess game (it isn't exactly chess but I don't know how it called in English) and I want to export it as runnable jar.

The problem is that images (at this program - the players) are not exported for some strange reason.

How to export runnable jar on eclipse with images? thanks.

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Are you certain the images are not in the Jar? How did you check? How does the code access the images? E.G. By File, URL etc. –  Andrew Thompson Oct 14 '12 at 10:00
    
open your jar file, are you sure your images are not there? –  PbxMan Oct 14 '12 at 10:08

3 Answers 3

The recommended way would be to have a resource directory under your project root and include it into the list of source code directories. This will result in all images there being copied into the JAR. If you make a subdirectory there, resource/image, then you'll end up with a JAR that has an image directory. You access those images through the classloader:

classloader.getResourceAsStream("/image/name.jpg");

or, whenever you pass the image to an API that accepts resource URLs:

classloader.getResource("/image/name.jpg");

Of course, this is all subject to how exactly you build your JAR, but if you do it through Eclipse's Export JAR, you'll be able to achieve what I'm describing. If you use Maven, there is a quite similar approach to the one I described.

Note also that I deliberately avoid demonstrating code that fetches the classloader as this is a non-trivial subject in Java and should be done in a context-specific way. However, if you do it from a class that is in the same JAR as the images, it is a safe bet that this will work from an instance method:

this.getClass().getClassLoader();

this is optional here, and is actually not recommended from the code style perspective, but I included it for clarity and because it would be wrong and dangerous to call getClass on an instance of any class other than your own.

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1  
Great answer. Now I look at it more closely, also note that classloader.getResource("/images/name.jpg"); can also be very handy, e.g. for Java sound API where the AudioSystem typically needs a repositionable input stream. –  Andrew Thompson Oct 14 '12 at 10:20
    
getClass().getClassLoader(); Prefix that by this.getClass().getClassLoader(); and it pretty much implies a custom class, of the programmer's devising. –  Andrew Thompson Oct 14 '12 at 10:21
1  
Generally, wherever an API does accept a resource URL rather than a stream, I'd say it is the preferred approach. –  Marko Topolnik Oct 14 '12 at 10:21
    
@AndrewThompson I didn't get your point with this.getClass(). I initially wrote it that way, but removed it for being redundant and not really idiomatic to Java (qualifying instance methods with an explicit this). Your point is that it is more educational to leave it? Because that was my initial motivation. –  Marko Topolnik Oct 14 '12 at 10:22
1  
"not explicit enough" Yes, I think that's it, but your explanation is better. Can you edit it into the answer? –  Andrew Thompson Oct 14 '12 at 10:32

Let me put a couple of examples in case you may find them interesting:

To write the resource (image) from jar file into a DataOutPutStream:

public static void readResourceFromJarToDataOutputStream(String file,
        DataOutputStream outW) {
    try {
        InputStream fIs = new BufferedInputStream(new Object() {
        }.getClass().getResourceAsStream(file));
        byte[] array = new byte[4096];
        for (int bytesRead = fIs.read(array); bytesRead != -1; bytesRead = fIs
                .read(array)) {
            outW.write(array, 0, bytesRead);
        }
        fIs.close();
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

To load the resource in memory (byte array):

public static byte[] readResourceFromJarToByteArray(String resource) {
    InputStream is = null;
    byte[] finalArray = new byte[0];
    try {
        is = new Object() {
        }.getClass().getResourceAsStream(resource);
        if (is != null) {
            byte[] array = new byte[4096];//your buffer size
            int totalBytes = 0;
            if (is != null) {
                for (int readBytes = is.read(array); readBytes != -1; readBytes = is
                        .read(array)) {
                    totalBytes += readBytes;
                    finalArray = Arrays.copyOf(finalArray, totalBytes);
                    System.arraycopy(array, 0, finalArray, totalBytes- readBytes, 
                            readBytes);
                }
            }
        }
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    } finally {
        try {
            if (is != null)
                is.close();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
    return finalArray;
}
share|improve this answer
    
"Another example of a read file in jar function:" Not a very good one. 1) readFileString(String file) The resource is not a File, so it pays not to confuse the user by implying it is. I'd go for readFileString(String resourcePath) 2) Better to declare the throws than try to handle them yourself without a finally or then go on to return a null or empty StringBuffer -- This is not source for others to learn from. –  Andrew Thompson Oct 14 '12 at 10:17
    
You are right!, let me tune it a little bit –  PbxMan Oct 14 '12 at 10:19
    
Very good anti-pattern! Where have you seen an image can be built from a StringBuffer? The initial question was "export images in a JAR"... –  Aubin Oct 14 '12 at 11:33
    
You were right, I don't know why I had text files in mind. –  PbxMan Oct 14 '12 at 13:36

Simply put ALL of the resources, such as images, text files, EVERYTHING into the directory where the runnable Jar will be. It solved the problem for me.

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