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So I'm currently working on writing some PWM code for a heater and fan. These are both connected to digital output pins of a National Instruments SCB-68 DAQ. I'm writing this using Visual Studio 2010, Windows 7, and a C# Forms application.

I'm using a timer on the form (15ms) to carry out this PWM but it is too slow, seems as though 15ms is the minimum speed available with this method as well. With the code shown below I am able to hear the individual pulses of the fan (period = 15ms * 10 = 150ms). Is there a purely software solution to speed up the period of my PWM waveform? I am not able to add any additional hardware, i.e. I can only use the DAQ and the fan/heater circuit.

Here are the relevant sections of code from my Form class:

private float pwmCounter, pwmPeriod, heaterDuty, fanDuty; // PWM variables
private bool heaterOn, fanOn; // PWM variables

private DigitalOut dOut = new DigitalOut();

public Interface()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        dOut.OpenChannel();
        dOut.WriteData(0); // 0 - both off, 1 - heater on, 2 - fan on, 3 - both on

        pwmCounter = 0;
        pwmPeriod = 10; // Actual period is pwmPeriod*pwmTimer.Interval
        heaterDuty = 0;
        fanDuty = 50;
    }

private void PWM_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        if (pwmCounter < pwmPeriod)
        {
            if (pwmCounter >= ((heaterDuty / 100) * pwmPeriod)) // (duty cycle / 100) * period
            {
                // Set heater low and maintain fan
                heaterOn = false;

                if (fanOn)
                    dOut.WriteData(2); // 0 - both off, 1 - heater on, 2 - fan on, 3 - both on
                else
                    dOut.WriteData(0); // 0 - both off, 1 - heater on, 2 - fan on, 3 - both on
            }

            if (pwmCounter >= ((fanDuty / 100) * pwmPeriod)) // (duty cycle / 100) * period
            {
                // Set fan low and maintain heater
                fanOn = false;

                if (heaterOn)
                    dOut.WriteData(1); // 0 - both off, 1 - heater on, 2 - fan on, 3 - both on
                else
                    dOut.WriteData(0); // 0 - both off, 1 - heater on, 2 - fan on, 3 - both on
            }
        }

        else if (pwmCounter == pwmPeriod)
        {
            heaterInd.BackColor = Color.Red;

            pwmCounter = 0; // Reset counter
            //heaterOn = true; // Set heater high
            fanOn = true; // Set fan high
            dOut.WriteData(3); // 0 - both off, 1 - heater on, 2 - fan on, 3 - both on
        }

        pwmCounter++;
    }

Thanks for any help!

share|improve this question
    
Just noticed that my code doesn't work for 0% duty cycles, let me know if there are any other bugs please –  user1744675 Oct 14 '12 at 10:14
    
Well, I am not so sure how much power it can generate and not to drop into zero state with this DAQ, however you can try to change pwmPeriod to some lower value, and see what happens then.For you, it would be more wise to first implement this in virtual reality using some of the softwares provided to you and see how device would react there. P.S. Yes, you do have 0 duty cycles. Check the code. –  Takarakaka Oct 14 '12 at 10:20
    
I'm not really sure what you mean about implementing it in virtual reality? It won't work properly for 0% I don't think as the line dOut.WriteData(3); will turn them both on when they shouldn't come on at all if it's 0%. I'll fix that with some if statements –  user1744675 Oct 14 '12 at 10:39

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