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Tried out this experiment today: opened two offline editors for a Google document. In one, I bolded the first word. In the second, I deleted it. Regardless of which client I turn on first, the word always ends up deleted.

First off, why is this the case - my understanding of operational transformation is that ordering matters? In the simple example of two people typing "a" and "b" respectively, if the server receives "a" first, it will enforce the output of "ab" by transforming the second person's "b" event into a "pass one space, then add b" event, and vice versa.

Secondly, if ordering doesn't matter, are there technical reasons as to why Google Docs has chosen to err on the side of deletion? Or are the reasons largely simplicity for users?

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This is a really good question and I'm not particularly in favor of the only answer here. Getting into OT Research myself I wouldn't mind seeing a clearer more ocncise response :) –  James Mills May 19 '14 at 5:14

1 Answer 1

It's not a question of erring on the side of deletion.

In cases where both clients have equality valid but differing versions of truth, Google Docs must elect to uphold one version, or else force users to resolve conflicts, something that is inherently complicated and hard to explain.

Thus, "truth" for Google Docs is consistency of the document, not discernment of intent. And consistency is best more easily achieved through destruction of information - a sort of tendency to entropy.

All this is basically my semi-philosophical BS though...

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So Google Docs "assumes" (perhaps incorrectly) that a destructive operation is the more semantically correct operation? –  James Mills May 19 '14 at 5:15
    
At least, according to me toying around with offline mode and making editing vs deletion changes. –  ehfeng May 20 '14 at 18:23
    
@enfeng Are you doing research in this area or just curios? –  James Mills May 21 '14 at 0:32

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