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I'm currently developing a Web API using the MVC 4 web API project type. I am currently at a stage where I need to add some security to the API. I am aware of the Authorize attribute, however, the client would prefer a different approach. For this I have tried to override the Authorize attribute in my own class and as a basic start I simply have the AuthorizeCore always returning false which should mean not authenticated. If i then add this to an Action within a controller, the action always completes and I always retrieve the data. I believe the reason may be due to the custom attribute not being registered in the web.config file, however, I am unsure how to go about this when not using forms authentication.

The code I am using to test is a fresh MVC 4 web API project with the custom attribute shown below.

public class Auth : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    protected override bool AuthorizeCore(HttpContextBase httpContext)
    {
        return false;
    }
    protected override void HandleUnauthorizedRequest(AuthorizationContext filterContext)
    {
        filterContext.Result = new RedirectResult("http://www.google.com");
    }
}

I have then added the attribute onto the Get method of the default ValuesController as such

[Auth]
public IEnumerable<string> Get()

However, when I navigate to domain/api/Values I am always presented with the data instead of the expected redirect to google. Any help is appreciated.

Edit: After looking around a little more I found this here: http://weblogs.asp.net/jgalloway/archive/2012/05/04/asp-net-mvc-authentication-customizing-authentication-and-authorization-the-right-way.aspx This suggests that I chose the wrong wrong AuthorizeAttribute class as I had chosen the one from System.Web.MVC rather than the one from System.Web.Http. It appears that the Http version does not allow the same level of configuration as the MVC version as it doesn't allow me to override the AuthorizeCore. Any more help on this is appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
I don't think it has anything to do with the wrong AuthorizeAttribute class. Put a breakpoint on the "return false;" statement, run in debug mode and see if you hit that statement. –  Turnkey Oct 14 '12 at 13:29
    
I have tried this and the breakpoint isn't hit at all. This matches with the behavior mentioned in the link that nothing at all would happen if the wrong attribute was used. –  bruinbrown Oct 14 '12 at 13:32
    
Yes, it looks like a difference in behavior in WebApi versus MVC. –  Turnkey Oct 14 '12 at 13:37

2 Answers 2

For WebApi you can force it to override the correct AuthorizeAttribute class by specifying it in the override. Also, it doesn't make sense to do a redirect, this just returns the unauthorized web response, which is proper for an API.

namespace WebApiTest
{
    public class Auth : System.Web.Http.AuthorizeAttribute
    {
        protected override bool IsAuthorized(System.Web.Http.Controllers.HttpActionContext actionContext)
        {
            return false;
        }

    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I should have mentioned that I just set this up for some basic testing currently, I do follow the convention normally. –  bruinbrown Oct 14 '12 at 13:08
up vote 6 down vote accepted

It appears that the problem was caused by using the wrong version of AuthorizeAttribute. After using the version found in System.Web.Http the code returns the correct error code should the user not have the required permissions. As an example here is the equivalent code to what I put in the original question

using System;
using System.Web.Http;
using System.Net.Http;

public class AuthAttribute : AuthorizeAttribute
{
    public override void OnAuthorization(System.Web.Http.Controllers.HttpActionContext actionContext)
    {
        HandleUnauthorizedRequest(actionContext);
    }

    protected override void HandleUnauthorizedRequest(System.Web.Http.Controllers.HttpActionContext actionContext)
    {
        var response = actionContext.Request.CreateResponse(System.Net.HttpStatusCode.Redirect);
        response.Headers.Add("Location", "http://www.google.com");
        actionContext.Response = response;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
On further review I would recommend not handling it with redirects but via standard response headers as is given in my revised answer. This will be more in line of expected behavior for clients that use an API. Then the client can do the redirect or present a response to the user. –  Turnkey Oct 14 '12 at 14:23

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