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I have file like this

1      2      "45554323"      p      b  
2      2      "34534567"      f      a  
3      3      "76546787"      u      b  
2      4      "56765435"      f      a  
*      a  
0      b  

I want delete a, b from two last Records in END{} section

Result:

1      2      "45554323"      p      b  
2      2      "34534567"      f      a  
3      3      "76546787"      u      b  
2      4      "56765435"      f      a  
*        
0        

How can I get n last lines and change fields on them with awk?

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's one way using GNU awk:

awk -v count=$(wc -l <file.txt) 'NR > count - 2 { $2 = "" }1' file.txt

Results:

1      2      "45554323"      p      b  
2      2      "34534567"      f      a  
3      3      "76546787"      u      b  
2      4      "56765435"      f      a  
* 
0 

Or to do awk operations for all records except 2 last lines of input file as a shell script, try ./script.sh file.txt. Contents of script.sh:

command=$(awk -v count=$(wc -l <"$1") 'NR <= count - 2 { $2 = "" }1' "$1"
echo -e "$command"

Results:

1  "45554323" p b
2  "34534567" f a
3  "76546787" u b
2  "56765435" f a
*      a  
0      b  
share|improve this answer

If you know the value of n - the line number after which you want to delete the last item on the line/colum (here 4) this will work:

awk '{if (NR>4) NF=NF-1}1' data.txt

will give:

1      2      "45554323"      p      b  
2      2      "34534567"      f      a  
3      3      "76546787"      u      b  
2      4      "56765435"      f      a  
*
0

NF = NF -1 makes awk think there is one less field on the line than there is, which is how it doesn't display the last column/item on the line once that condition is met. NR refers to the current line number in the file being read.

awk can't know the number of lines in a file unless it goes through it once, or is given that information (e.g., wc -l). An alternative approach would be to save the last n lines in a buffer (sort of a sliding window/tape-delay type analogy, you are always printing n lines behind) and then process the final n lines in the END block.

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@levon..the number of records is variable because my file is a result of other awk operation and my two last lines changes in this operation but i want delete new columns created in two last records – mohammad Oct 14 '12 at 13:54
1  
@mohammadreshad If you know the number of lines in the file (from your previous operation) than you ought to be able to change the condition to if (NO_OF_LINE - 2 > NR) or something along those lines. awk won't be able to know the number of lines unless it goes through the file once, or you provide it with that information. Maybe sed could possibly do this more easily. – Levon Oct 14 '12 at 13:57

This doesn't exactly answer your question but it produces the output you require:

$ gawk '{if (NF < 3) print $1; else print}' input.txt
1      2      "45554323"      p      b
2      2      "34534567"      f      a
3      3      "76546787"      u      b
2      4      "56765435"      f      a
*
0
share|improve this answer
$ cat file
1      2      "45554323"      p      b
2      2      "34534567"      f      a
3      3      "76546787"      u      b
2      4      "56765435"      f      a
*      a
0      b

$ awk 'BEGIN{ARGV[ARGC++]=ARGV[ARGC-1]} NR==FNR{nr++; next} FNR>(nr-2) {NF--} 1' file
1      2      "45554323"      p      b
2      2      "34534567"      f      a
3      3      "76546787"      u      b
2      4      "56765435"      f      a
*
0

or if you don't mind manually specifying the file name twice:

awk 'NR==FNR{nr++; next} FNR>(nr-2) {NF--} 1' file file
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