Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Canvas

The quickest description of this answer is that I am trying to find the coordinates of the white dot. The dark red is a drawn arc over a drawn circle (dark blue).

The longer explanation: I have a class that is extending View and that is drawing a circle on the canvas (the canvas has equal width and height):

canvas.drawArc(rectF, 0, 360, true, paint); // mOvals is a RectF object with 4 coordinates

Then I draw an arc that is N percent wide (let's say 225 in this case). The arc starts from -90 degrees (because 0 degrees in the canvas means 3'o clocks) and "strays" N degrees (225 in this example).

I am trying to calculate the X/Y coordinates or the center of the remaining arc (the area that is not covered by the red arc; that is between N and 360).

I have the radius of the circle which is canvasWidth/2 if that is of some help.

Here's how I draw the red arc:

long arcEnd = (360 * fractionNumber) / totalNumber;
canvas.drawArc(rectF, -90, arcEnd, true, paint);
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

(Original answer updated. It may be a bit too verbose now, but I hope it helps.)

You're looking for the XY coordinates (called Cartesian coordinates), but these are difficult to calculate directly. The trick is to go through Polar coordinates first. Polar and Cartesian are two ways of expressing the same thing, namely a point in a grid and can be converted into eachother.

Polar coordinates consist of angle and distance from the center point. You can calculate the desired angle because you know the percentage of the circle that you need to cover and you can calculate the distance from the center because you know the radius of the circle.

Your covering arc is 225 degrees, so the remainder is 135 and half that is 67.5 degrees. The angle for the point you're looking for is therefore 225+67.5 = 292.5 degrees. The radius for that point is half the radius of the circle, so that's canvasWidth/4.

Once you've determined the polar coordinate, (292.5, canvasWidth/4), you convert this to the XY coordinate using the conversion function. There's one thing that's a bit tricky: Math.cos(double) and Math.sin(double) expect their argument to be in radians, not in degrees. You express your 292.5/360 as x/2π before making the conversion, which you do by multiplying the value by π/180, giving 5.1051 in this case.

Assuming that canvasWidth is 400:

double tdeg 292.5d; // Calculated from arc percentage 
int r =  100;      // Calculated from canvas width

double trad = tdeg * (Math.PI/180d); // = 5.1051

int x = (int) r * Math.cos(trad);
int y = (int) r * Math.sin(trad);
share|improve this answer
    
Can you elaborate a bit? I tried running the original X and Y coordinates through Math.atan2(x, y), but it only returns a number like 0.8612618928415864. Do you know how can I convert it to actual coordinates? –  hasMobi - Android Apps Oct 14 '12 at 14:50
    
It's not the XY coordinates (cartesian coordinates) that you feed through the conversion, but polar coordinates. Polar and Cartesian are just two ways of expressing the same thing (a point in a grid). Polar coordinates consist of angle (normally between 0 and 360 or 0 and 2π for a full circle) and distance from the center point. You can calculate the desired angle because you know the percentage and you can calculate the distance because you know the radius of the circle. Once you've determined the polar coordinate, you convert this to the XY coordinate using the function I linked to. –  Barend Oct 14 '12 at 15:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.