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I have some text files as follows

293  800 J A              0   0  162
294  801 J R        -     0   0   67  
295  802 J P        -     0   0   56
298  805 J G  S    S-     0   0   22 
313  820 J R  T  4 S-     0   0  152 

I would like to print column4 if column5 is empty.

desired output

>filename
ARP

I used the following code. But this code prints only the filenames.

awk '{ 
if (FNR == 1 ) print ">" FILENAME 
  if ($5 == "") {
printf $4 

 }
} 

END { printf "\n"}' *.txt
share|improve this question
    
in your example it indeed looks like there is more than 1 space between the first and the second column; please check that and adjust the data field you want accordingly (thats only possible if the number of spaces is constant; if not you have to use FIELDWIDTHS) - when i select your example i get 2 spaces; if thats the case it should be $6, not $5; and $5 instead of $4 –  Seismoid Oct 14 '12 at 14:19

5 Answers 5

Here's one way using GNU awk:

awk 'BEGIN { FIELDWIDTHS="5 4 2 3 3 2 7 4 3" } FNR==1 { print ">" FILENAME } $5 == "   " { sub(/  $/, "", $4); printf $4 } END { printf "\n" }' file.txt

Result:

>file.txt
ARP
share|improve this answer
    
@steve.Thank you very much for your answer. I tried your code.It doesn't print column4. It prints only filenames. –  user1606717 Oct 14 '12 at 14:48
    
@user1606717: You may need to fiddle with the fieldwidths. Since awk doesn't understand empty fields, you need to set FIELDWIDTHS so that awk can understand what a field looks like. In future, I would highly recommend outputting your data with a delimiter other than space (if possible). I've tested the code on the sample file you describe. –  Steve Oct 14 '12 at 15:00

What character(s) separate your "columns"? Remember that by default awk treats any contiguous sequence of white space characters as a field separator so if your fields (columns) are separated by sequences of white space characters then there's no way for awk to tell when a field is missing unless your fields are fixed width and then you can use substr() or gawk's FIELDWIDTHS or similar to identify where the fields lie.

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This is not an elegant solution by any means and it is specific to this file.

You can do something like this

cut -c1-15 yourtext | awk '$5 {print $4}'

where 15 is the number of characters including column 5.

I do strongly agree with steve's suggestion to use an better alternative for your files. Or at least put a dummy/error value instead of leaving columns blank.

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awk '{if(substr($0,15,1)~/ /)printf("%s",$4);}' your_file

tested below:

> cat temp
293  800 J A              0   0  162
294  801 J R        -     0   0   67  
295  802 J P        -     0   0   56
298  805 J G  S    S-     0   0   22 
313  820 J R  T  4 S-     0   0  152
> awk '{if(substr($0,15,1)~/ /)printf("%s",$4);}' temp
ARP>
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This is a starting point assuming the variations in column numbers stay the same.

awk '$5 !="" && NF<=8 {printf $4}END{print "\n"}' data.txt

yields

ARP

you can graft on the parts to display the filename.

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