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I'm trying to learn assembly and have found that I keep getting segfaults when trying to push/pop data off of the stack. I've read a few guides and know how the stack works and how to work with the stack; but don't know why I keep getting the error.

Can someone help?

segment .data
        myvar: db "hello world", 0xA0, 0
        myvarL: equ $-myvar

segment .text
        global _start

_start:
        push ebp
        mov ebp, esp
        push myvarL
        push myvar
        call _hworld

        mov eax, 1
        mov ebx, 0
        int 0x80

_hworld:
        mov eax, 4
        mov ebx, 1
        mov ecx, [ebp+4]
        mov edx, [ebp+8]
        pop ebp
        int 0x80
        ret

I'm assuming that the +4 is 32 bits, then +8 is 64 bits. It isn't really clear to me why this way is being done on some of the guides I've read. I would assume that myvar is 13 bytes?

This is error:

$ ./pushpop 
Segmentation fault
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2  
Are you absolutely sure you first call _hworld and then run it again? i.e. where's the exit() of your program? –  Aki Suihkonen Oct 14 '12 at 16:55
    
The 4/8 thing is probably due to stack alignment. I think I'm right in saying that generally speaking, the stack pointer stays aligned to the machine word-length. So will only move in 32 or 64 bit chunks. –  lynks Oct 14 '12 at 16:57
    
Had made a few typo's; meant 13 bytes and yes after adding exit still get segfault –  josten Oct 14 '12 at 17:22

3 Answers 3

Just a thought

segment .data
    myvar: db "hello world", 0xA0, 0
    myvarL: equ $-myvar
segment .text
    global _start
_start:
    push ebp
    mov ebp, esp
    push myvarL
    push myvar
    call _hworld
    pop  ebp          // 
 //
    mov eax,1
    mov ebx,0
    int 80h  ; // exit

_hworld:
    mov eax, 4
    mov ebx, 1
    mov ecx, [ebp+4]
    mov edx, [ebp+8]
//  pop ebp               <-- this will pop the return address
    int 0x80
    ret
share|improve this answer
    
That's not it. Or that's just a part of it. ebp+4/8 points up the stack, to the return address and parameters of _start. ebp-4/8 ponts down the stack, to the pushed myvarL and myvar. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 14 '12 at 17:03
_start:
        push ebp
        mov ebp, esp ; ebp points to its old value on the stack
                     ; ebp + 4 points to the return address from _start
                     ; ebp + 8 points to 1st on-stack parameter to _start

        push myvarL ; ebp - 4 points to myvarL on stack
        push myvar ; ebp - 8 points to myvar on stack
        call _hworld

;       are we going to now execute _hworld without a call???
;       vvvv

_hworld:
        mov eax, 4
        mov ebx, 1
        mov ecx, [ebp+4] ; ebp + 4 points to return address from _start
        mov edx, [ebp+8] ; ebp + 8 points to 1st on-stack parameter to _start
;                  ^^^^ why???

Btw, I'm not sure the colon is right in here: myvarL: equ $-myvar, unless, of course, push myvarL turns out to be push 13.

Oh, and this line:

        pop ebp

is going to steal the return address from _hworld, so the following ret will fetch myvar from the stack as the return address and try to execute myvar as code.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, the pop ebp would pop the return address –  Aki Suihkonen Oct 14 '12 at 17:05
    
Yeah, lose the pop ebp and it should work. You'll still have some cruft on the stack, but sys_exit shouldn't care. Use [esp + 4] etc. to find your parameters. –  Frank Kotler Oct 14 '12 at 17:33
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The reason why my code was segfaulting was because I was not saving esp upon entering the _hworld segment and was not restoring it upon leaving.

This is the new working code:

segment .data
    myvar: db "hello world", 0x0A, 0
    myvarL: equ $-myvar
    myvar2: db "super bad test", 0x0A, 0
    myvar2L: equ $-myvar2

segment .text
    global _start

_start:
    push myvarL ; store myvarL on the stack
    push myvar  ; store myvar on the stack
    call _hworld

    push myvar2L    ; store myvar2L on the stack
    push myvar2 ; store myvar2 on the stack
    call _hworld2

    mov eax, 1
    mov ebx, 0
    int 0x80

_hworld:
    push ebp    ; store the current value of ebp on the stack (hence +8)
    mov ebp, esp    ; store current esp in ebp

    mov eax, 4
    mov ebx, 1
    mov ecx, [ebp+8]    ; +4 is old ebp
    mov edx, [ebp+12]
    int 0x80

    mov esp, ebp    ; restore ebp to esp
    pop ebp     ; restore ebp
    ret

_hworld2:
    push ebp    ; store old ebp on the stack
    mov ebp, esp    ; store esp in ebp

    mov eax, 4
    mov ebx, 1
    mov ecx, [ebp +8]   ; +4 is old ebp
    mov edx, [ebp +12]
    int 0x80

    mov esp, ebp    ; restore ebp to esp
    pop ebp     ; restore ebp
    ret
share|improve this answer
    
You seem to leave the variables myvarXX into the stack. –  Aki Suihkonen Oct 15 '12 at 3:22

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