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I have list of comments which have attrs: pk (primary key), parent_pk (primary key of parent) and others... I want to display them w/ respect to nesting — if comment has children, display comment and then children which are indented more. Comment is child of other comment when it's pk is the same as other comments' parent_pk.

I will originally implement it in my Django blog, but first I want to learn how-to. That's why, for the sake of simplicity, I have created CLI app. I know that there are working-ready solutions out there, but I want to learn to do it myself. :)

This is my code for now:

class Comment(object):
    def __init__(self, pk, parent_pk, content):
        self.pk = pk
        self.parent_pk = parent_pk
        self.content = content

    def has_children(self, comments):
        for comment in comments:
            if self.pk == comment.parent_pk:
                return True
        return False

    def get_children(self, comments):
        children = []
        for comment in comments:
            if self.pk == comment.parent_pk:
                children.append(comment)
        return children


def print_nested(comments, level=0):
    def to_whitespaces(level):
        if level == 0:
            return ""
        else:
            return " " * (level * 2)

    for comment in comments:
        print to_whitespaces(level) + comment.content
        if comment.has_children(comments):
            print_nested(comment.get_children(comments), level + 1)
            comments.pop(0)

comments = [
    Comment(1, None, "foo"),
    Comment(2, 1, "foo bar"),
    Comment(3, None, "spam"),
    Comment(4, 3, "spam cheese"),
    Comment(5, 4, "spam cheese monty"),
    Comment(6, None, "muse"),
]

print_nested(comments)

Here's it on Sprunge.us (w/ syntax).

Expected result:

foo
  foo bar
spam
  spam cheese
    spam cheese monty
muse

Actual result:

foo
  foo bar
spam
  spam cheese
spam cheese monty
muse

As you can see, spam cheese monty isn't indented at all. Any ideas why's that? How would you implement it? Thanks!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you recursively call print_nested you only call it with the elements that are children of the current element.

So wen you call print_nested for the children of spam, you get only spam cheese.

That means that when you call get_children on spam cheese, there are no elements in the comments list you pass it, so spam cheese monty doesn't get indented because it is only encountered as a member of the outermost call to print_nested.

If you want to maintain the current structure of your script, you need to make get_children recursive, so it finds the children of the children ad infinitum.

A better way would be to build a real tree out of the comments, where you can actually look up parent comments without doing a list traversal.

A simple method that works for your example and can easily be converted to use a tree instead of a list:

class Comment(object):
    def __init__(self, pk, parent_pk, content):
        self.pk = pk
        self.parent_pk = parent_pk
        self.content = content

    def depth(self):
        depth = 0
        comment = self
        # this is just a recursive lookup converted to iterative
        while comment.parent_pk:
            # replace the array indexing with traversing up a tree
            comment = comments[comment.parent_pk - 1]
            depth += 1
        return depth

def print_nested(comments):
    for comment in comments:
        print comment.depth() * 2 * " " + comment.content

comments = [
    Comment(1, None, "foo"),
    Comment(2, 1, "foo bar"),
    Comment(3, None, "spam"),
    Comment(4, 3, "spam cheese"),
    Comment(5, 4, "spam cheese monty"),
    Comment(6, None, "muse"),
]

print_nested(comments)
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, this is truly awesome! I can't quite understand... 1. Instead of doing recursion in printing function, we create new method for Comment which goes through all comments in comments list (little strange that you don't pass it as argument to depth() method) and recursively finds comment's depth? 2. Will this solution work if primary keys will be messed-up (any order)? –  daGrevis Oct 14 '12 at 18:43
    
@daGrevis As I mention in the post and comments, you should build a tree out of the comments and use that data structure to find parents. That will remove the sensitivity to the order of the comments in the list. I just didn't write that part for you since I could illustrate the general method of calculating depth with your list since pks and indexes happen to correlate. –  agf Oct 14 '12 at 19:36

you just need a recursive function which checks the children and prints them:

class Comment(object):
    def __init__(self, pk, parent_pk, content):
        self.pk = pk
        self.parent_pk = parent_pk
        self.content = content



def print_nested(comments,pk=None,level=0):
    for comment in comments:
        if comment.parent_pk==pk:
            print ' ' * (level * 2), comment.content
            print_nested(comments,comment.pk,level+1)

comments = [
    Comment(101, None, "foo"),
    Comment(201, 101, "foo bar"),
    Comment(301, None, "spam"),
    Comment(415, 301, "spam cheese"),
    Comment(505, 415, "spam cheese monty"),
    Comment(622, None, "muse"),
]

print_nested(comments)
share|improve this answer
    
This requires you to look through the whole list of comments for every comment, giving it O(n^2) complexity. The general method I use in my answer can easily be improved to give O(n) performance. –  agf Oct 14 '12 at 19:40

After you display Comment(4, 3, "spam cheese"), which happens as a child of Comment(3, None, "spam"), you get it pop-ed out of comments. So when you process Comment(5, 4, "spam cheese monty"), the parent "pk" is missing, thus result is displayed as root

share|improve this answer
    
So "pop'ing" won't do here, right? –  daGrevis Oct 14 '12 at 18:11
    
Did you try removing the pop? It still doesn't work correctly. –  agf Oct 14 '12 at 18:13
    
After removing the poppastie.org/5058188 . I put it there because else all children are always printed out anyway. –  daGrevis Oct 14 '12 at 18:17

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