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I've got this loop that is run thousands of times (so needs to be efficient). It changes the value of the bitmap pixel.

I want to be able to run thought the loop and "switch" a certain group of pixels to alpha and then switch them back at a later point.

My question is. How do I switch the values? So say 0xFFCC1BE0 becomes 0x00CC1BE0 and then if I want to switch back to 0xFFCC1BE0 I simply take the 00 and turn it too FF.

I can't make two bitmaps as I run out of memory :-(

Anyhow here's what I've got so far:

private void setTransparencyOnLightMap(float WidthPercentage, float LeftPosition)
{
    int blankPixel = 0x00000000;
    int savedPixel = 0x00000000;
    int desiredAlpha = 200; //Can also be 0x00
    //Find away of turning alhpa off and on.

    for(int BMx = 0; BMx < mLightMap.getWidth(); BMx++)
    {
        for(int BMy = 0; BMy < mLightMap.getHeight(); BMy++)
        {
            if(mLightMap.getPixel(BMx, BMy) != blankPixel) //Make sure don't overwrite blank transparent pixels.
            {
                savedPixel = mLightMap.getPixel(BMx,BMy);
                savedPixel = savedPixel | (desiredAlpha << 24);

                mLightMap.setPixel(BMx, BMy, savedPixel);
            }   
        }
    }
}
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could switch the alpha of a pixel like so:

savedPixel = savedPixel & 0x00FFFFFF;
savedPixel = savedPixel | (desiredAlpha << 24);

The first line zeros out the 8 most significant bits of savedPixel (these are the bits where the alpha is held). The second line sets the 8 most significant bits of savedPixel to desiredAlpha. Note that desiredAlpha must be between 0 and 255 (These are the ints that can be stored in 8 bits).

Note that this uses bitwise operators, (&, |, <<) which are very efficient.

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That should be << 24, not 23. See this Python code. –  Eric Oct 14 '12 at 19:13
    
Thanks, I'll change it. –  Tristan Hull Oct 14 '12 at 19:21
    
This is the first time I've come across bitwise operators, just taking sometime to understand them. So I can switch the old colour back on? (without any storage correct?) –  Abakiz Myth Oct 14 '12 at 20:43
    
No you would have to store your old alpha. You cannot just switch it back as the alpha could be anything before you switch it. The alpha is only 2 bytes however. If you wanted to switch the alpha back, you would do the same as above replacing "desiredAlpha" with your old alpha value. –  Tristan Hull Oct 14 '12 at 20:46
    
But I don't have the old value, so there's no way of just turning off the first 2 bits the turning them back on again? –  Abakiz Myth Oct 14 '12 at 21:16

It seems to me, to reduce memory use, you can just save the original Alpha value of each pixel rather than the whole ARGB value - to do this use a byte array which will be 1/4 the size of the original bitmap. Also use a bit-mask for the new Alpha so you can use bitwise AND (&) as described by Tristan Hull...

byte[] savedAlphaArray = new byte[mLightMap.getWidth(), mLightMap.getHeight()];
int desiredAlphaMask = 0x00FFFFFF;
int pixel;

Then to save the Alpha values and apply the bit-mask do the following...

for (int i = 0; i < mLightMap.getWidth(); i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < mLightMap.getHeight(); j++) {
        pixel = mLightMap.getPixel(i, j);
        savedAlphaArray[i, j] = (pixel & 0xFF000000) >> 24;
        mLightMap.setPixel(i, j, desiredAlphaMask & pixel);
    }
}

To 'switch' back do the following...

for (int i = 0; i < mLightMap.getWidth(); i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < mLightMap.getHeight(); j++) {
        pixel = mLightMap.getPixel(i, j);
        mLightMap.setPixel(i, j, savedAlphaArray[i, j] << 24 & pixel);
    }
}
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Will this work well with a png that already has alpha values in some parts? –  Abakiz Myth Oct 14 '12 at 20:54
    
@AbakizMyth : To be honest I really don't know. I've never tried the code I posted and was only working on what the question was asking for. Simply saving the original Alpha then setting it with the bit-mask and then alternative code to restore the original Alpha. It's basically just Hex logic. –  Squonk Oct 14 '12 at 23:14

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