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Is it posible to have 2 sources in the same mount point?

Example:

Source 1 (from S1 IP adress) sends music to IP Icecast2 server. Source 2 (from S2 IP adress) sends voice to Ip Icecast2 server.

Listener run: mplayer ip_icecast2:8000/example.ogg..

The listener listen the music and sound at the send time..

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4 Answers 4

Liquidsoap should be able to handle the mixing and setting the proper metadata.. The web site is at http://savonet.sourceforge.net/

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Yes, but not with Icecast alone.

What you need to do is mix the two streams. Icecast doesn't have any features for doing anything like this. There are many ways to do this. I would probably look at mixing the streams together with FFMPEG. You can use the amerge and amix filters.

Now, you need to get the output of FFMPEG to your Icecast server. With some scripting, you should be able to pipe the STDOUT from FFMPEG to a TCP connection to Icecast. Prior to sending data, you will need to send the appropriate headers and what not.

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you can actually do it without anything else, you need to specify 3 streams

  • stream
  • live
  • autodj

the trick relies in a tag called fallback, you directly configure it on icecast xml file, and it does something like - if the live audio is not available, fall back to autodj, and any1 of it will directly play on stream, giving preference to live

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I'm assuming you mean one source of audio and one of speaking, from different URLs. If you don't know how to use Soap, you could grab both the audio and music streams using a 3rd party application like SAM broadcaster.

This will decode the streams and mix them like a conventional audio mixer before re-encoding and sending out to a single Icecast server as one stream.

Keep in mind, if you are doing voice overs, there will be latency to deal with. i.e. speaking will be heard by the final listener slightly after the part of audio you will be speaking to. This depends on the buffer lengths involved, and is because SAM broadcaster will be 'listening' to the audio at the same place you are (assuming you are speaking to the source audio stream). Then you need to add to that, the playing buffer SAM needs to process, playing your voice's stream to be mixed and passed on.

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