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I'd like to write a Perl GTK+ application which will:

0.1) Press button A
0.2) Disable A
0.3) start threads 1 and 2
0.4) start thread 3

Thread 3 does the following:

3.1) join thread 1
3.2) join thread 2
3.3) Enable A

On completion of thread 3, the button A should be enabled again.

Now, this kind of approach is perfectly valid in C/C++ under Win32, Linux using native GUI libraries and/or GTK+, KDE. Problem with GTK+ and Perl is that you can't share the button variable within threads (eg. point 3.3 can't be performed by thread 3).

The problem is that threads::shared works only on base types, not on references like Gtk2::Button.

I tried to bless the Gtk2::Button object again (as shown in the docs), but I got an error:

my $thread_button = shared_clone(Gtk2::Button->new('_Threads'));
bless $thread_button => 'Gtk2::Button';
$hbox->pack_start($thread_button, FALSE, FALSE, 0);
my ($jobA, $jobB);
$thread_button->signal_connect( clicked => sub {
    	$thread_button->set_sensitive(0);
    	if (defined($jobA)) {
    		$jobA->join();
    	}
    	if (defined($jobB)) {
    		$jobB->join();
    	}
    	# spawn jobs
    	$jobA = threads->create(\&async_func, 10);
    	$jobB = threads->create(\&async_func, 10);
    	threads->create(sub { 
    		$jobA->join();
    		$jobB->join();
    		bless $thread_button => 'Gtk2::Button';
    		$thread_button->set_sensitive(1);
    		});
    });

Is my code ok?
I'm asking because when it runs the GUI won't display the Thread button and report the following error:

Gtk-CRITICAL **: gtk_box_pack: assertion `GTK_IS_WIDGET (child)' failed at vbox.pl line 48. (Where I use pack_start)
GLib-GObject-WARNING **: invalid (NULL) pointer instance at vbox.pl line 67.
GLib-GObject-CRITICAL **: g_signal_connect_closure: assertion `G_TYPE_CHECK_INSTANCE (instance)' failed at vbox.pl line 67. (the signal_connect doesn't work)

Apparently this doesn't work with complex objects.
I've tried another fix, polling for the running threads inside a callback function invoked in the main (GTK) thread:

my $thread_button = Gtk2::Button->new('_Threads');
$hbox->pack_start($thread_button, FALSE, FALSE, 0);
my ($jobA, $jobB);
$thread_button->signal_connect( clicked => sub {
    	$thread_button->set_sensitive(0);
    	# spawn jobs
    	$jobA = threads->create(\&async_func, 10);
    	$jobB = threads->create(\&async_func, 10);
    	Glib::Timeout->add(3000, sub { 
    			print "TIMER\n";
    			if (defined($jobA)) {
    				if (! $jobA->is_running()) {
    					print "jobA is not running!\n";
    					$jobA->join();
    					undef $jobA;
    				}
    			}
    			if (defined($jobB)) {
    				if (! $jobB->is_running()) {
    					print "jobB is not running!\n";
    					#$jobB->join();
    					undef $jobB;
    				}
    			}
    			if (!defined($jobA) && !defined($jobB)) {
    				print "Both jobs have terminated!\n";
    				$thread_button->set_sensitive(1);
    				return 0;
    			}
    			return 1;
    			});
    });

Please note the following things:
1) I have to comment the join on the second thread

#$jobB->join();

Otherwise the applet will crash.
2) Apparently it works, but when I click on the re-enabled button for the second time, the thread creation crahses the application

This is a lot unstable. I thought Perl was more C based, but this huge instability is totally absent in C/C++. I'm a bit disappointed.
Does anyone have more suggestions? Is the multithread API such unnstable in Perl?

Latest update. This code works:

my $thread_button = Gtk2::Button->new('_Threads');
$hbox->pack_start($thread_button, FALSE, FALSE, 0);
my ($jobA, $jobB);
$thread_button->signal_connect( clicked => sub {
    	$thread_button->set_sensitive(0);
    	# spawn jobs
    	$jobA = threads->create(\&async_func, 10);
    	$jobB = threads->create(\&async_func, 10);
    	Glib::Timeout->add(100, sub { 
    			if (!$jobA->is_running() && !$jobB->is_running()) {
    				print "Both jobs have terminated!\n";
    				$thread_button->set_sensitive(1);
    				return 0;
    			}
    			return 1;
    			});
    });

But:
1) I have to poll for threads (not very resources intensive on modern CPUs but NOT elegant ... one should rely only on OS sync primitives)
2) I can't join threads otherwise the applet crashes
3) Given (2) there are huge memory leaks every time I push the button

Honestly the more I see this the more I'm convinced that for proper app dev you can't rely on Perl...but even from a prototype-wise point of view it kinda sucks.
I hope I'm doing something wrong...in this case, could anyone please help me?

Cheers,

share|improve this question
    
Why are you joining $jobA and $jobB outside of the third thread? –  Sinan Ünür Aug 17 '09 at 17:09
    
The logic is that jobA and jobB get joined by thread 3, so that when jobA and jobB are terminated the third thread can enable the button again, just before quitting. –  Ema Aug 18 '09 at 8:09

2 Answers 2

As explained in the threads::shared docs, you need to re-bless shared objects.

Update: Try the following variation

#!/usr/bin/perl

package Button;

use strict;  use warnings;
# Trivial class because I do not have GTK2

sub new { bless \ my $self => $_[0] }
sub enable     { ${ $_[0] } = 1; return }
sub disable    { ${ $_[0] } = 0; return }
sub is_enabled { ${ $_[0] } ? 1 : 0 }

package main;

use strict;  use warnings;
use threads; use threads::shared;

my $buttonA = shared_clone( Button->new );
my $button_class = ref $buttonA;

$buttonA->disable;

my @thr = map { threads->create(
    sub {
        print "thread $_ started\n";
        sleep rand 3;
        print "thread $_ finished\n";
        return; }
) } (1, 2);

my $thr3 = threads->create( sub {
        $_->join for @_ ;
        bless $buttonA => $button_class;
        $buttonA->enable;
    }, @thr,
);

$thr3->join;

printf "buttonA is %s\n", $buttonA->is_enabled ? 'enabled' : 'disabled';

Another alternative is to pass a callback to $thr3:

my $buttonA = Button->new;
share($buttonA);
$buttonA->disable;

# start the other threads

my $thr3 = threads->create( sub {
        my $callback = shift;
        $_->join for @_ ;
        $callback->();
    }, sub { $buttonA->enable }, @thr,
);

Both versions of the code produce the output:

thread 1 started
thread 2 started
thread 1 finished
thread 2 finished
buttonA is enabled
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work with proper GTK+ gui elements. Or the button can't be shared or it crahses (as expected). As seen as this is not C/C++ I think a proper example should be provided against GTK+ widgets, not easy-to-handle mock-up classes. Cheers, –  Ema Aug 18 '09 at 8:07

I've read a couple of examples about threads and GTK in perl, but all of them initialize worker threads and then they'll switch their status to run/halt...
Very bad example of concurrent development.

Any more suggestions?

Cheers,

share|improve this answer

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