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when I call a method from a RMI Ubuntu client on the OSX server passing an UnicastRemoteObject as parameter, things are super slow. So slow, that eventually, it gets executed but more likely, I get timeout exceptions after like 2-3 minutes. Both machines are in the same network. It's a freshly installed Ubuntu 12.04. I can telnet from the Ubuntu machine to the OSX one on the used RMI port, so at this point, it doesn't seem to be a problem. I can also call methods on the server without this UnicastRemoteObject parameter and everything works fine. From OSX to OSX is also fine...

This is, how the server gets started:

LocateRegistry.createRegistry(port);
nodeManager = new NodeManagerImpl(maxConfigurationsPerNode, true);
Registry registry = LocateRegistry.getRegistry(host, port);
registry.rebind("NodeManager", nodeManager);

And this is, how the client connects and calls the method:

Registry registry = LocateRegistry.getRegistry(host, port);
nodeManager = (NodeManager) registry.lookup("NodeManager");
handler = new NodeHandlerImpl();
id = nodeManager.register(handler, id);

NodeHandlerImpl is basically this:

public class NodeHandlerImpl extends UnicastRemoteObject implements NodeHandler {
    public NodeHandlerImpl(boolean noSSL) throws RemoteException {
        super(0, null, null);
    }
....
}

The call to "register" is the one taking ages... NodeHandler extends Remote. When I remove the parameter handler, everything works fine again...

I'm a bit stuck here since a few hours, any clue would be great.

// Edit: Yep, Reverse DNS was the error. With this hint, I found this site: http://www.communardo.de/home/techblog/2008/09/17/rmi-kommunikation-zu-remote-hosts-mit-unguenstiger-dns-konfiguration/

So I changed my client connect code to the following and everything was fine:

System.setProperty("java.rmi.server.hostname", host);
Registry registry = LocateRegistry.getRegistry(host, port);
nodeManager = (NodeManager) registry.lookup("NodeManager");
handler = new NodeHandlerImpl();
id = nodeManager.register(handler, id);
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

This is most likely DNS misconfiguration. Java uses both DNS and reverse DNS. Make sure both are working correctly at both client and server hosts when looking up the other.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! But the host-parameter is directly the IP like "192.168.168.21". Where should DNS be used here? –  Philip Oct 14 '12 at 20:18
    
@Philip Reverse DNS, as I said. –  EJP Oct 14 '12 at 20:28
    
That was it, I edited my question with the answer! :) –  Philip Oct 14 '12 at 20:30

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