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I have a long-running windows service that constantly receives data and processes it, then puts it into the database. I use stored procedures for the complex operations, but some of them have many parameters.

I'm aware that this is the suggested 'best practice':

using(IDbConnection connection = GetConnection())
{
   connection.Open();
   // Do stuff
   connection.Close();
}

Resulting in short-lived connections, but taking full advantage of connection pooling. However, this practice really seems to negate the benefits of a stored procedure. I have something like this at the moment:

while(true) 
{ 
  var items = GetData(); // network I/O
  using(IDbConnection conn = GetConn()) 
  {
    connection.Open();
    var tran = connection.BeginTransaction();
    var preparedStatement1 = SQL.Prepare(connection, "...", ...);
    var preparedStatement2 = SQL.Prepare(connection, "...", ...);
    var preparedStatement3 = SQL.Prepare(connection, "...", ...);

    foreach(var item in items) 
    {
      // loop which calls SQL statements.
    }
    connection.Close();
  }
}

I really feel that I should open the connection outside of the while loop so it stays alive a long time; and prepare the statements before entering the loop. That would give me the full benefit of using the stored procedures:

using(IDbConnection conn = GetConn()) 
{
  connection.Open();
  var tran = connection.BeginTransaction();
  var preparedStatement1 = SQL.Prepare(connection, "...", ...);
  var preparedStatement2 = SQL.Prepare(connection, "...", ...);
  var preparedStatement3 = SQL.Prepare(connection, "...", ...);

  while(!service.IsStopped) 
  { 
    var items = GetData(); // network I/O  
    foreach(var item in items) 
    {
      // loop which calls SQL statements.
    }      
  }
  connection.Close();
}

So the question is, does the performance benefit of stored procedures outweigh the "risks" of leaving connections open for a long time? The best practices never seem to mention prepared statements, and the MSDN documentation (I'm using SQL Server) seems to suggest Prepare()ing will sometimes be a no-op: SQLCommand.Prepare()

share|improve this question
1  
A connection can stay open if it's used anyway. So there's nothing wrong in it. You just need to ensure that it gets closed as soon as it's unused. – Tim Schmelter Oct 14 '12 at 20:44
    
You're probably going to find that against SQL Server, the call to Prepare is going to be negligible, as the query plans are cached (depending on use). That said, have you tried and measured the difference? That's the easiest way to tell. – casperOne Oct 14 '12 at 20:53

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