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I wonder how to accomplish the same thing the below program does without using extra threads or await and async keywords but only Tasks. A sample code would be awesome. It seems to me that we need to use TaskCompletionSource and Async versions of the IO-bound operations or any long-running operations.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
  Task t = Go();
  Console.WriteLine("Hello World");
  Task.Delay(1000).GetAwaiter().OnCompleted(() => { Console.WriteLine("Completed"); });
  Console.ReadLine();
}

static async Task Go()
{
  var task = PrintAnswerToLife();
  await task;
  Console.WriteLine("Done");
}

static async Task PrintAnswerToLife()
{
  var task = GetAnswerToLife();
  int answer = await task;
  Console.WriteLine(answer);
}

static async Task<int> GetAnswerToLife()
{
  var task = Task.Delay(2000);
  await task;
  int answer = 21 * 2;
  return answer;
}
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Please check channel9.msdn.com/Events/Build/BUILD2011/TOOL-829T it is not an easy task –  zahir Oct 14 '12 at 21:36
    
@zahir Seems a nice link. Thanks a bunch. –  Tarik Oct 14 '12 at 21:38

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You can do a pretty straightforward translation of async / await into Task by using ContinueWith. Other translations are also possible, e.g., Task.Delay becomes System.Threading.Timer.

The basic pattern is, for any async method that does an await:

static async Task Go()
{
  var task = PrintAnswerToLife();
  await task;
  Console.WriteLine("Done");
}

becomes:

static Task Go()
{
  var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<object>();
  var task = PrintAnswerToLife();
  task.ContinueWith(_ =>
  {
    Console.WriteLine("Done");
    tcs.SetResult(null);
  });
  return tcs.Task;
}

Correct error handling is a lot more work.

share|improve this answer
    
There is actually one more thing, ContinueWith should work in the same synchronization context of the original method. –  zahir Oct 15 '12 at 17:24
    
Good catch. In this example, it doesn't matter, but normally ContinueWith should take TaskScheduler.FromCurrentSynchronizationContext. –  Stephen Cleary Oct 15 '12 at 20:07

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