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I am trying to optimize a chunk of code where speed is very important and wondered if checking the int that holds the number of times a for loop is about to loop and not doing the for loop if it is equal to zero was any faster or slower than just letting the for loop execute 0 times.

I realize that any speed improvement would be tiny; it just started to become more of a curiosity. Also would this be different from Java to say C++ or C?

Example:

size=0;
for (int i = 0;i<size;i++)
{
}

or

size=0;
if (size!=0)
{ 
    for (int i = 0;i<size;i++)
    {
    }
}

Of course, in the real code the size is often not zero, but when it is which would be faster if either?

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closed as not constructive by Kev Oct 14 '12 at 23:08

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I would say that the second form is slower due to additional checks and code size. IMHO. –  SJuan76 Oct 14 '12 at 21:41
1  
I don't know about speed, but if there is a difference it will be minor if not negative, if check around the loop is a lot less elegant. That said iterators are even nicer. –  111111 Oct 14 '12 at 21:42
    
Why don't you just set the time you start each test, and the time after it executes? Then you'll know which one is faster. –  Eric Leroy Oct 14 '12 at 21:42
    
assume i already initialized the int i so that is not an issue. –  RustyH Oct 14 '12 at 21:42
8  
It seems you are curious enough to ask, but not curious enough to measure. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 14 '12 at 21:43
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Academically? Yes, since every time the size isn't 0, it will run 1 extra comparison.

Realistically? No. When you're talking comparisons like this, you're counting nanoseconds, especially after the JVM creates the machine language and it gets executed directly on the processor.

Now, which one should you use. Probably the first one. It doesn't save time, and it's shorter and cleaner. Even better, Java has a for-each loop construct that makes it so you don't have to have the index at all:

String[] strs = ... ;
for (String str : strs) {
    // Do something with str
}

For arrays, this compiles to an indexed for-loop. For Collection objects:

Collection<String> strs = ... ;
for (String str : strs) {
    // Do something with str
}

This one compiles to a for loop with an Iterator declaration.

These are the best option if you don't need the index itself, since it compiles to the same thing after compilation, it's clear, and it's the same for both arrays and collections.

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Thank you ill take it before the downvotes kill what little rep i have. –  RustyH Oct 14 '12 at 22:06
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As you said it doesn't really make that much difference, but as there is one more check in the second one, it would take more time to run the second one compared to first one.

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when the size is greater than 0. –  Bhesh Gurung Oct 14 '12 at 21:48
    
I am not 100% sure but in my opinion regardless of the value of size you still perform that check. That's the reason that you perform that check to be honest. –  Jail Oct 14 '12 at 21:53
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