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What would be the XPATH 1.0 equivalent of using a nested query along with "ALL" keyword in SQL. For example consider the following snippet.

<parent> a <child gender = "male">b</child>
<child gender = "female>c</child></parent>
<parent> z <child gender = "male"> y </child></parent>

How should i retrieve nodes where ALL children have gender = "male". This could be done in SQL by writing a subquery to return gender of children and then nesting it with the ALL keyword to check if all children were male.

Q2 Also how do I retrieve all parents with one and only one(male) child. Also consider that parent may have other nodes. Counting the number of children parents has having name "child" and checking if the child is the way i am thinking of going about the problem. Is that the best way or is there a better way of doing it??

Note: In my assignment I am facing a problem which needs similar queries. I tried to find answers myself but could not. Please help

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
How should i retrieve nodes where ALL children have gender = "male". 

Use:

/*/parent[child
        and
          (not(child[not(@gender) or not(@gender='male')]))
         ]

This select all parent elements that:

  1. Are children of the top element of the XML document, and

  2. Have a child child, and

  3. Whose all child children have a gender attribute, and

  4. Whose all child children's gender attribute has the string value of "male"

Here we have used the very generic and useful double-negation law

Your second question:

Q2 Also how do I retrieve all parents with one and only one(male) child.

Use:

/*/parent[child[@gender='male']
        and
          not(child[2])
         ]

This selects:

  1. Any parent element that is a child of the top element of the XML document, and

  2. That has a child child whose gender attribute's string value is "male", and

  3. That doesn't have a second child child.

XSLT - based verification:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
  <xsl:copy-of select=
  "/*/parent[child
           and
            (not(child[not(@gender) or not(@gender='male')]))
            ]"/>
  ==========

  <xsl:copy-of select=
  "/*/parent[child[@gender='male']
           and
             not(child[2])
            ]"/>

 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the following XML document (the provided one, extended to be made more representative):

<t>
    <parent> a
        <child gender="male">b</child>
        <child gender="female">c</child>
        <child gender="female">d</child>
    </parent>
    <parent> e
        <child gender="male">f</child>
        <child gender="male">g</child>
        <child gender="female">h</child>
    </parent>
    <parent> z
        <child gender="male">x</child>
        <child gender="male">y</child>
    </parent>
    <parent> t
        <child gender="male">u</child>
    </parent>
</t>

The two XPath expressions are evaluated and the results (selected elements) from these evaluations are copied to the output:

<parent> z
        <child gender="male">x</child>
   <child gender="male">y</child>
</parent>
<parent> t
        <child gender="male">u</child>
</parent>
  ==========

  <parent> t
        <child gender="male">u</child>
</parent>
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ALL: select parents that have children, but have no children with non-male gender:

//parent[child and not child[@gender!="male"]]

Selecting parents with exactly one male child - select parents with exactly one child that have a male child:

//parent[count(child)=1 and child[@gender="male"]]
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How should i retrieve nodes where ALL children have gender = "male".

A couple of respondents have interepreted this as meaning there must be at least one child. But you asked for the equivalent of SQL's ALL operator, and I believe that in SQL (as in mathematical logic), ALL returns true if applied to an empty set. (All unicorns have two horns - show me one that doesn't.)

So I think that the strict answer to your question would remove the "child and" that Dimitre included in his answer. But Dimitre may have guessed correctly that what you asked for wasn't what you actually wanted.

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