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I am new to C++ and I am trying to allow the user to keep entering doubles into an array, the program stops when the user enters -1. The code I have works but when 12 items are added to the array I get these errors:

*** glibc detected *** ./exercise2: double free or corruption (out): 0x00000000010aa070 ***
======= Backtrace: =========

and:

Aborted (core dumped)

Here is my code:

int main(){
    int size=5;
    int i=0;
    double *numbers = new double[size];
    cout<<"Enter your double:"<<endl;

    while(1){
    double *numbers2=new double[size];

    cin>>numbers[i];

    if(i>=size-1){
        size=size*2;
        memcpy(&numbers2, &numbers, size);
        delete[]numbers;
    numbers=numbers2;
    }

    if(numbers[i]==-1){
        break;
    }
    cout<<numbers[i];
        i++;
    } 
}
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closed as too localized by Lightness Races in Orbit, Lucifer, Aleks G, berry120, Ingo Karkat Oct 15 '12 at 13:08

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Why are you not using std::vector? –  Wyzard Oct 14 '12 at 22:28
1  
Is this some kind of learning exercise ? In C++ the appropriate way to do this would be to use std::vector or std::list. –  Alexandre P. Levasseur Oct 14 '12 at 22:28
    
numbers2 isn't any bigger than numbers at the time you do the memcpy. –  Joe Oct 14 '12 at 22:28
    
Can't see how this question will ever help anyone else. Voting to close as too localised. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 14 '12 at 22:29
    
Definately very localized, and the numbers2 should be allocated inside the if after the size has been doubled, if you really want to fix the program. Also, I recommend realloc if you must use non-c++ types. –  perh Oct 14 '12 at 22:30

2 Answers 2

I suggest simplifying the problem and using an std::vector

#include <vector>

int main()
{
  std::vector<double> numbers;

  // get numbers and push into vector if valid
  double x;
  cin >> x;
  numbers.push_back(x):
}
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There are several problems:

1) size can either be the number of elements in the array, or it can be the memory size of the array. There are currently no architectures for which the size of a double is 1 memory unit.

2) After deleting the array, it really should be reallocated with the newly computed size. Otherwise, writing into memory which has been deleted is undefined behavior. In this case, it can lead to bad things happening, like segfaults.

3) Comparing floating point values for equality is problematic.

I have slightly rewritten the code to address all these issues.

using namespace std;
int main()
{
    int size=5;
    double *numbers = new double[size];
    cout << "Enter your double:" << endl;

    for (int i=0;  ; ++i)
    {
        cin >> numbers[i];

        if (i >= size-1)
        {
            size *= 2;
            double *numbers2 = new double[size];
            if (!numbers2)
            {
                 cerr << "failed allocating memory" << endl;
                 exit(1);
            }

            memcpy (numbers2, numbers, sizeof double * (size/2));
            delete[] numbers;
            numbers = numbers2;
        }
        // compare for -1 within epsilon of 1e-7
        if (abs (numbers[i] + 1) <= 1e-7)
            break;

        cout << numbers[i];
    }
}
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