Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Using C#, how can I delete all files and folders from a directory, but still keep the root directory?

share|improve this question
4  
What would be nice if DirectoryInfo had a method like .Clean(); –  JL. Aug 17 '09 at 15:54
2  
or .DeleteFolders, and DeleteFiles methods. –  JL. Aug 17 '09 at 15:54
13  
You want to be aware that your Deletes could very easily throw an exception if a file is locked (or if you don't have rights). See the FileInfo.Delete for a list of the exceptions. –  Shane Courtrille Aug 17 '09 at 15:56

21 Answers 21

up vote 217 down vote accepted
System.IO.DirectoryInfo downloadedMessageInfo = new DirectoryInfo(GetMessageDownloadFolderPath());

foreach (FileInfo file in downloadedMessageInfo.GetFiles())
{
    file.Delete(); 
}
foreach (DirectoryInfo dir in downloadedMessageInfo.GetDirectories())
{
    dir.Delete(true); 
}
share|improve this answer
3  
What's is about stackoverflow.com/questions/12415105/… "When you call Directory.Delete and a file is open in such way, Directory.Delete succeeds in deleting all files but when Directory.Delete calls RemoveDirectory a "directory is not empty" exception is thrown because there is a file marked for deletion but not actually deleted." –  Kiquenet Jul 19 '13 at 7:54
2  
The user did not mention that he has problems with open files. So it's out of scope for that question. –  gsharp Mar 10 '14 at 10:02
10  
DirectoryInfo is slow as this gathers much more other data. BTW: Directory.Delete(path, true) will take care of all :) –  AcidJunkie Apr 1 '14 at 16:44
6  
@AcidJunkie, That will also remove the directory in question, whereas the OP specifically asks for the root directory to be kept. –  Marc L. May 30 '14 at 17:40
    
+1 for the extension method. –  Mike Devenney Jul 26 '14 at 1:15

Yes, that's the correct way to do it. If you're looking to give yourself a "Clean" (or, as I'd prefer to call it, "Empty" function), you can create an extension method.

public static void Empty(this System.IO.DirectoryInfo directory)
{
    foreach(System.IO.FileInfo file in directory.GetFiles()) file.Delete();
    foreach(System.IO.DirectoryInfo subDirectory in directory.GetDirectories()) subDirectory.Delete(true);
}

This will then allow you to do something like..

System.IO.DirectoryInfo directory = new System.IO.DirectoryInfo(@"C:\...");

directory.Empty();
share|improve this answer
4  
The last line should be subDirectory.Delete(true) instead of directory.Delete(true). I just cut-and-pasted the code and it deleted the main directory itself. Thanks for the code it's great! –  Aximili Jun 9 '10 at 5:18
15  
note that Empty exists in C# already, for string. If I saw something else named Empty I would be surprised if it modified the object (or filesystem) instead of giving me a bool that says if it is empty or not. Because of that, I would go with the name Clean. –  Default May 24 '12 at 7:14
3  
@AdamRobinson Just wanted to make note of it. To me, what Microsoft has in their code do have some bearing. But it's for everyone to interpret :) –  Default May 24 '12 at 14:20
1  
@noahnu: No, this will only call each function one time. –  Adam Robinson Apr 8 '13 at 0:09
2  
@simonhaines: The point of the question was to empty the directory (i.e. delete everything inside of it), not to delete the directory itself. –  Adam Robinson Sep 26 '13 at 3:58

This code will clear the folder recursively.

    private void clearFolder(string FolderName)
    {
        DirectoryInfo dir = new DirectoryInfo(FolderName);

        foreach(FileInfo fi in dir.GetFiles())
        {
            fi.Delete();
        }

        foreach (DirectoryInfo di in dir.GetDirectories())
        {
            clearFolder(di.FullName);
            di.Delete();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

We can also show love for LINQ:

using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
…
var directory = Directory.GetParent(TestContext.TestDir);

directory.EnumerateFiles()
    .ToList().ForEach(f => f.Delete());

directory.EnumerateDirectories()
    .ToList().ForEach(d => d.Delete(true));

Note that my solution here is not performant, because I am using Get*().ToList().ForEach(...) which generates the same IEnumerable twice. I use an extension method to avoid this issue:

using System.IO;
using System.Linq;
…
var directory = Directory.GetParent(TestContext.TestDir);

directory.EnumerateFiles()
    .ForEachInEnumerable(f => f.Delete());

directory.EnumerateDirectories()
    .ForEachInEnumerable(d => d.Delete(true));

This is the extension method:

/// <summary>
/// Extensions for <see cref="System.Collections.Generic.IEnumerable"/>.
/// </summary>
public static class IEnumerableOfTExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Performs the <see cref="System.Action"/>
    /// on each item in the enumerable object.
    /// </summary>
    /// <typeparam name="TEnumerable">The type of the enumerable.</typeparam>
    /// <param name="enumerable">The enumerable.</param>
    /// <param name="action">The action.</param>
    /// <remarks>
    /// “I am philosophically opposed to providing such a method, for two reasons.
    /// …The first reason is that doing so violates the functional programming principles
    /// that all the other sequence operators are based upon. Clearly the sole purpose of a call
    /// to this method is to cause side effects.”
    /// —Eric Lippert, “foreach” vs “ForEach” [http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/05/18/foreach-vs-foreach.aspx]
    /// </remarks>
    public static void ForEachInEnumerable<TEnumerable>(this IEnumerable<TEnumerable> enumerable, Action<TEnumerable> action)
    {
        foreach (var item in enumerable)
        {
            action(item);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
And if you're trying to delete subdirectories as well, foreach (var dir in info.GetDirectories("*", SearchOption.AllDirectories).OrderByDescending(dir => dir.FullName.Length)) dir.Delete(); might be of use. –  Warty Jan 1 '14 at 1:31
1  
If you like performance, consider using directory.EnumerateFiles() and directory.EnumerateDirectories() instead of the directory.Get*() methods. –  Tinister Apr 15 '14 at 17:22
1  
Funny, my own IEnumerable<T>.ForEach() extension has a summary XML comment, "Violation! Violation! Unclean!". –  Marc L. Jun 2 '14 at 19:58

Based on the hiteshbiblog, you probably should make sure the file is read-write.

private void ClearFolder(string FolderName)
{
    DirectoryInfo dir = new DirectoryInfo(FolderName);

    foreach (FileInfo fi in dir.GetFiles())
    {
        fi.IsReadOnly = false;
        fi.Delete();
    }

    foreach (DirectoryInfo di in dir.GetDirectories())
    {
        ClearFolder(di.FullName);
        di.Delete();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
 new System.IO.DirectoryInfo("C:\Temp").Delete(true);

 //Or

 System.IO.Directory.Delete("C:\Temp", true);
share|improve this answer
1  
The second option, Directory.Delete(String, Boolean) worked for me. –  Stephen MacDougall Mar 4 '13 at 15:16
    
Does this delete the directory if it has sub-directories and files? –  Jordan Jan 17 '14 at 20:40
    
@Jordan: yes.... –  ThulasiRam Jan 20 '14 at 5:28
4  
This deletes the root directory, where the OP specifically asked that it be retained. –  Marc L. May 30 '14 at 17:30
1  
Delete will throw if the directory doesn't exist, so it would be safer to do a Directory.Exists check first. –  James Apr 24 at 15:26

Every method that I tried, they have failed at some point with System.IO errors. The following method works for sure, even if the folder is empty or not, read-only or not, etc.

ProcessStartInfo Info = new ProcessStartInfo();  
Info.Arguments = "/C rd /s /q \"C:\\MyFolder"";  
Info.WindowStyle = ProcessWindowStyle.Hidden;  
Info.CreateNoWindow = true;  
Info.FileName = "cmd.exe";  
Process.Start(Info); 
share|improve this answer
    
I always prefer rd /s /q + mkdir when it comes to emptying directories. –  JohnM2 May 21 '14 at 16:23
    
This is not cross-platform solution. Unix-like systems clearly don't have cmd.exe, they don't even run .exe files. C# is not Windows only, there's also Mono, which is cross-platform. –  Sarge Borsch May 2 at 8:15
string directoryPath = "C:\Temp";
Directory.GetFiles(directoryPath).ToList().ForEach(File.Delete);
Directory.GetDirectories(directoryPath).ToList().ForEach(Directory.Delete);
share|improve this answer

In Windows 7, if you have just created it manually with Windows Explorer, the directory structure is similar to this one:

C:
  \AAA
    \BBB
      \CCC
        \DDD

And running the code suggested in the original question to clean the directory C:\AAA, the line di.Delete(true) always fails with IOException "The directory is not empty" when trying to delete BBB. It is probably because of some kind of delays/caching in Windows Explorer.

The following code works reliably for me:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(@"c:\aaa");
    CleanDirectory(di);
}

private static void CleanDirectory(DirectoryInfo di)
{
    if (di == null)
        return;

    foreach (FileSystemInfo fsEntry in di.GetFileSystemInfos())
    {
        CleanDirectory(fsEntry as DirectoryInfo);
        fsEntry.Delete();
    }
    WaitForDirectoryToBecomeEmpty(di);
}

private static void WaitForDirectoryToBecomeEmpty(DirectoryInfo di)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        if (di.GetFileSystemInfos().Length == 0)
            return;
        Console.WriteLine(di.FullName + i);
        Thread.Sleep(50 * i);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
What's is about stackoverflow.com/questions/12415105/… "When you call Directory.Delete and a file is open in such way, Directory.Delete succeeds in deleting all files but when Directory.Delete calls RemoveDirectory a "directory is not empty" exception is thrown because there is a file marked for deletion but not actually deleted." –  Kiquenet Jul 19 '13 at 7:55
    
@Kiquenet: Looks like we found an issue in Windows. Windows could have consulted the list of files marked for deletion and if all files in the directory are marked for deletion, do not say that directory is not empty. Anyway my WaitForDirectoryToBecomeEmpty() is a workaround. –  farfareast Jul 26 '13 at 16:56

The following code will clean the directory, but leave the root directory there (recursive).

Action<string> DelPath = null;
DelPath = p =>
{
    Directory.EnumerateFiles(p).ToList().ForEach(File.Delete);
    Directory.EnumerateDirectories(p).ToList().ForEach(DelPath);
    Directory.EnumerateDirectories(p).ToList().ForEach(Directory.Delete);
};
DelPath(path);
share|improve this answer

The simplest way:

Directory.Delete(path,true);  
Directory.CreateDirectory(path);
share|improve this answer
 foreach (string file in System.IO.Directory.GetFiles(path))
            {
                System.IO.File.Delete(file);
            }

            foreach (string subDirectory in System.IO.Directory.GetDirectories(path))
            {
                System.IO.Directory.Delete(subDirectory,true); 

            } 
share|improve this answer
DirectoryInfo Folder = new DirectoryInfo(Server.MapPath(path)); 
if (Folder .Exists)
{
    foreach (FileInfo fl in Folder .GetFiles())
    {
        fl.Delete();
    }

    Folder .Delete();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Could you be more specific and explain how and why this should work? –  Rune Apr 11 '13 at 7:32
3  
Answers with only code are not suitable. You should explain how and why it should work/solve the problem. –  rdurand Apr 11 '13 at 7:37
using System;
using System.IO;
namespace DeleteFoldersAndFilesInDirectory
{
     class Program
     {
          public static void DeleteAll(string path)
          {
               string[] directories = Directory.GetDirectories(path);
               string[] files = Directory.GetFiles(path);
               foreach (string x in directories)
                    Directory.Delete(x, true);
               foreach (string x in files)
                    File.Delete(x);
          }
          static void Main()
          {
               Console.WriteLine("Enter The Directory:");
               string directory = Console.ReadLine();
               Console.WriteLine("Deleting all files and directories ...");
               DeleteAll(directory);
               Console.WriteLine("Deleted");
          }
     }
}
share|improve this answer

use DirectoryInfo's GetDirectories method.

foreach (DirectoryInfo subDir in new DirectoryInfo(targetDir).GetDirectories())
                    subDir.Delete(true);
share|improve this answer

this will show how we delete the folder and check for it we use Text box

using System.IO;
namespace delete_the_folder
{
public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void Deletebt_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        //the  first you should write the folder place
        if (Pathfolder.Text=="")
        {
            MessageBox.Show("ples write the path of the folder");
            Pathfolder.Select();
            //return;
        }

        FileAttributes attr = File.GetAttributes(@Pathfolder.Text);

        if (attr.HasFlag(FileAttributes.Directory))
            MessageBox.Show("Its a directory");
        else
            MessageBox.Show("Its a file");

        string path = Pathfolder.Text;
        FileInfo myfileinf = new FileInfo(path);
        myfileinf.Delete();

    }


}

}
share|improve this answer

To Delete The Folder This is code using Text box And Button using System.IO;

private void Deletebt_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        System.IO.DirectoryInfo myDirInfo = new DirectoryInfo(@"" + delete.Text);

        foreach (FileInfo file in myDirInfo.GetFiles())
        {
            file.Delete();
        }
        foreach (DirectoryInfo dir in myDirInfo.GetDirectories())
        {
            dir.Delete(true);
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
private void ClearDirectory(string path)
{
    if (Directory.Exists(path))//if folder exists
    {
        Directory.Delete(path, true);//recursive delete (all subdirs, files)
    }
    Directory.CreateDirectory(path);//creates empty directory
}
share|improve this answer
1  
See below..."deleting and recreating" is not the same as keeping, all ACL customizations will be lost. –  Marc L. May 30 '14 at 17:28
IO.Directory.Delete(HttpContext.Current.Server.MapPath(path), True)

You don't need more than that

share|improve this answer
2  
Wrong... this will also delete the root directory. –  L-Three Aug 24 '13 at 12:03

The only thing you should do is to set optional recursive parameter to True.

Directory.Delete("C:\MyDummyDirectory", True)

Thanks to .NET. :)

share|improve this answer
2  
This also deletes the directory itself. –  rajat Dec 20 '13 at 7:22
DirectoryInfo dir = new DirectoryInfo(folder);
dir.Delete(true);
dir.Create();
share|improve this answer
1  
This does not preserve the root folder. –  John Allers Aug 5 '11 at 22:01
    
Apologies. Updated accordingly. –  Simon Aug 23 '11 at 8:47
2  
It does according to MSDN: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/d869eykc.aspx (since .NET 2.0) –  Simon Aug 31 '11 at 15:01
25  
-1 Deleting and recreating the folder is NOT the same as keeping it. You will lose all custom permissions for that folder. –  Gh0sT Oct 19 '11 at 14:36
1  
If not good answer, better delete, isn't? –  Kiquenet Jul 19 '13 at 10:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.