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g++ would nt even compile it. Where was I wrong? These are the error message:

gcc sign.c sign.c: In function âmainâ: sign.c:35:2: warning: format not a string literal and no format arguments [-Wformat- security]

==================================================================================

#include "stdio.h"

int string_length(char str[]);
void string_sort(char s[]);

void string_sort(char s[])
{
    char tmpt;
    int i, j, len;
    len=string_length(s);
    for(i=0; i<len-1; i++){
            for (j=i+1; j<len; j++){
                    if (s[i] > s[j]){
                            tmpt=s[i];
                            s[i]=s[j];
                            s[j]=tmpt;
                    }
            }
    }
}


int string_length(char str[]){
    int i;
    for(i=0; i<80; i++){
            if(str[i]=='\0'){
                    return(i);
            }
    }
}

int main(){
    char words[80];
scanf("%s", words);
    printf(words);
    string_sort(words);
    printf(" ");
    printf(words);
    printf("\n");




    while ( words != " "){
            scanf("%s", words);
            printf(words);
            string_sort(words);
            printf(" ");
            printf(words);
            printf("\n");
    }
}
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This is very strongly not C++ code –  sehe Oct 14 '12 at 22:38
2  
@sehe: That's not really a constructive comment, because that code can be compiled with a C++ compiler. Just because it's not how you would write it, doesn't mean it's not C++ code. –  Greg Hewgill Oct 14 '12 at 22:39
    
@GregHewgill have you seen stackoverflow.com/q/12887060/85371. I wonder where the OP gets the code –  sehe Oct 14 '12 at 22:44
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3 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

First, that's just a warning message, which means the compiler detected something probably wrong but compiled your code anyway. Not all compilers give the same warnings, as you've noticed.

The problem is this line (and all the other lines like it):

printf(words);

When using printf, you must use a format string, something like this:

printf("%s", words);

Otherwise, if the things you're printing (words) happens to have any % characters in it, then printf() will treat those as formatting specifiers and try to read arguments that you haven't supplied.

If you just want to print a string by itself, then puts can be useful:

puts(words);

This prints words followed by a newline.

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Perhaps he compiled with -Werror. –  Zach Rattner Oct 14 '12 at 22:39
    
That's possible, but the OP doesn't state either way. –  Greg Hewgill Oct 14 '12 at 22:40
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The warning says basically that you have to write

printf("%s", words);

instead of just

printf(words);

Indeed, using it could be a potential bug in your program, and even a security breach, e.g. if words is controlled by the user (which is exactly the case for your program) and may therefore contain %n etc. In your case, words will be treated as a format specifier.

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You should not use printf with an unknown format string:

printf(words);

Try

printf("%s", words);

In this case,

printf("%s\n", words);
puts(words); // includes \n

would be nice

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