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In Javascript, I have a matrix with a variable number of rows and columns, which I wish to store in a multi-dimensional array.

The problem is that I need extra 3 columns and 3 extra rows with negative indexes in the matrix too. So the result for a 10x10 matrix should be a 13x13 array with indexes from -3 to 9.

I define the array with:

  var numberofcolumns = 10;
  var numberofrows = 10;
  var matrix = [];
  for (var x = -3; x < numberofcolumns; x++) {
    matrix[x] = [];
  }

Is this the right way to do this? Or is there a better way?

share|improve this question
    
What do you matrix.length expect to be, 10 or 13? Do you need it at all? What about Array methods (which don't work for negative indizes), do you need them or do you want them to operate only on the "visible" part? If no, consider just using an object to make sure it's no usual array. –  Bergi Oct 14 '12 at 23:50
    
I updated my answer, check it out! –  Jan Oct 16 '12 at 11:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could define the matrix as an object instead. You would lose some array functionality but you could still access matrix[-3] for example.

  var numberofcolumns = 10;
  var numberofrows = 10;
  var matrix = {};
  for (var x = -3; x < numberofcolumns; x++) {
    matrix[x] = [];
  }
  for (x in matrix) {
    console.log(matrix[x]);
  }

Or you could define your own class starting as an object or array and work from there. Here's something to get you started:

function Matrix() { };

Matrix.prototype.LBound = function()
{
    var n;
    for (i in this) {
        if (!isNaN(i) && (isNaN(n) || n > i))
            n = parseInt(i);
    }
    return n;
};

Matrix.prototype.UBound = function()
{
    var n;
    for (i in this) {
        if (!isNaN(i) && (isNaN(n) || n < i))
            n = parseInt(i);
    }
    return n;
};

Matrix.prototype.length = function()
{
    var length = this.UBound() - this.LBound();
    return isNaN(length) ? 0 : length+1;
};

Matrix.prototype.forEach = function(callback, indexes)
{
    if (!indexes) var indexes = [];
    for (var i = this.LBound(); i <= this.UBound() ; i++)
    {
        indexes[Math.max(indexes.length-1, 0)] = i;
        callback(this[i], indexes);
        if (this[i] instanceof Matrix)
        {
            var subIndexes = indexes.slice();
            subIndexes.push("");
            this[i].forEach(callback, subIndexes);
        }
    }
};

Matrix.prototype.val = function(newVal)
{
    if (newVal) 
    {
        this.value = newVal;
        return this;
    }
    else
    {
        return this.value;
    }
};

Then you'd create your matrix as such

var numberofcolumns = 10;
var numberofrows = 10;

var matrix = new Matrix();

for (var i = -3; i < numberofcolumns; i++) {
    matrix[i] = new Matrix();
        for (var j = -4; j < numberofrows; j++) {
            matrix[i][j] = new Matrix();
            matrix[i][j].val("test " + i + " " + j);
        }
}

And you can run some cool functions on it

console.log("Upper bound: " + matrix.LBound());
console.log("Lower bound: " + matrix.UBound());
console.log("Length: " + matrix.length());

matrix.forEach(function(item, index) 
    {
        if (item.val()) 
            console.log("Item " + index + " has the value \"" + item.val() + "\""); 
        else
            console.log("Item " + index + " contains " + item.length() + " items"); 
    });

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/uTVUP/

share|improve this answer

While you can create attributes that are negative numbers, you lose some of Javascript's pseudo-array magic. In particular, matrix.length will still be 10 even though it has 13 elements. And the code in general may be surprising to anyone reading it.

You might be better off defining an offset to get the value you need out of the array index and vice-versa:

var offset = 3
for (var x=-3; x<numberofcolumns; x++) {
   matrix[x+offset] = []
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I understand now why I got such funny results when trying to log the array with console.log(). I don't really like using an offset though, since the first 3 columns should be really outside the 'normal' matrix... –  Dylan Oct 14 '12 at 23:12

I agree with Mark Reed's points about this being a unintuitive use of Array. I think a subclass is in order. You could follow the tutorial here to subclass Array, keep the native bracket notation, and override methods like length() so they give sensible values. Subclassing would have the added advantage of making it clear to those reading your code that something besides your everyday array is going on.

share|improve this answer
    
length is no method in JS, but a very special property of native Array instances. State of the art is that you can't subclass JS Arrays, you only can decorate instances. –  Bergi Oct 14 '12 at 23:46
    
The article I linked describes decorating instances, I was using loose language I suppose. You're right about length though, I had forgotten that. –  Chris Oct 15 '12 at 12:00

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