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#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

int main(void)
{
///-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------///
/// Initializes necessary variables. Description of each variable provided.
        int a, b, c; // Sides of triangle
        int N; // User-defined integer, where c<N
        int k=0; // Counter necessary for 'if loop'
        int thinA=0, thinB=0, thinC=0; // Memory for sides of 'thinnest' triangle
        double totalAngle = 180; // Sum of interior angles in a triangle
///-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------///
/// Introduction
        printf("This program prints out all Pythagorean triples as (a,b,c) when given a positive integer, N, where c<N. \n\nThis program will also print out the number of triples and the 'thinnest' \n triangle in this range.\n\n");
///-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------///
/// Requests user input for variable N. The program will then find all pythagorean triples that have side lengths less than N.
        printf("Enter a positive integer: ");
        scanf("%d", &N);
///-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------///
/// Initilizes computing of side lengths, using several 'if' loops embedded within one another
        // Side A
        for (a=1; a<N; a++)
        {
            // Side B
            for (b=1; b<N; b++)
            {
                // Side C
                for(c=1; c<N; c++)
                {
                    // Validation of a right angle triangle. Also validates that side A is less than side B so no triangle is listed twice
                    if (a*a + b*b == c*c && a < b)
                    {
                        // Prints out listed side lengths of every acceptable triangle. Also increments counter for proper print statements at end
                        printf("\n(%d %d %d)", a, b, c);
                        k++;
///-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------///
/// Determination of thinnest triangle
                        if (atan(a*1.0/b) < totalAngle)
                        {
                            totalAngle = atan(a*1.0/b);
                            thinA = a;
                            thinB = b;
                            thinC = c;
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
///-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------///
/// Results
        // If the counter incremented (that is, a triangle was found to exist where c<N), then it will print the amount of triangles found.
        // If not, it will state that no triangles were found.
        if (k > 0)
        {
            printf("\n\nThere are %d Pythagorean triples in this range.\n", k);
            printf("\nThe thinnest right-angle triangle is formed by (%d %d %d).\n\n", thinA, thinB, thinC);

        }
        else
            printf("\nThere are no pythagorean triples.\n\n");
///-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------///
/// END OF SCRIPT
///-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------///
    return 0;
}

Evening all. My code takes in user-defined int variable N and outputs every Pythagorean triple that is within the range (0,N). Lets say I enter N as 12, the following will print:

Enter a positive integer: 12
(3 4 5) 
(6 8 10)
There are 2 Pythagorean triples in this range.
The thinnest right-angle triangle is formed by (3 4 5).

What adjustments need to be made to make the order of printing like this?

Enter a positive integer: 12 
There are 2 Pythagorean triples in this range.
(3 4 5)
(6 8 10)
The thinnest right-angle triangle is formed by (3 4 5).

Cheers and thanks again!

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You'll better end your printf format strings with \n (which also might flush) -instead of using \n at the start of the format strings- or else call fflush. In particular, a printf before a scanf should have its format string ending with \n –  Basile Starynkevitch Oct 14 '12 at 23:41

2 Answers 2

Dont use the line

    printf("\n(%d %d %d)", a, b, c);

in this line, store the value in a variable of type string. And after this two lines

    printf("\n\nThere are %d Pythagorean triples in this range.\n", k);
    printf("\nThe thinnest right-angle triangle is formed by (%d %d %d).\n\n", thinA, thinB, thinC);

Add more one printf that prints the string variable created.

share|improve this answer
    
"A variable of type string"? C doesn't have that. C has pointers to char, but you have to manage the memory manually. –  icktoofay Oct 15 '12 at 0:07
1  
@icktoofay, for simplicity, i am trying to explain the "general idea" of the solution, not to discuss language característics, but, if you write this, you got the "general idea". –  Ewerton Oct 15 '12 at 11:59

I see several possibilities, which one is best depends - as so often - on other aspects of the program:

By far the simplest to implement is to first calculate k, print out the number, and redo the loop to print out the results, like this

    // pass 1: determine k
    for (a=1; a<N; a++)
    {
        // Side B
        for (b=1; b<N; b++)
        {
            // Side C
            for(c=1; c<N; c++)
            {
                // Validation of a right angle triangle. Also validates that side A is less than side B so no triangle is listed twice
                if (a*a + b*b == c*c && a < b)
                {
                    k++;
                }
            }
        }
   }
   if (k > 0) {
       printf("There are %d Pythagorean triples in this range.\n", k);
   } else {
       printf("There are no pythagorean triples.\n\n");
       // we're done
       return 0;
   }
   // pass 2 - print out the triples found and the thinnest
    for (a=1; a<N; a++)
    {
        // Side B
        for (b=1; b<N; b++)
        {
            // Side C
            for(c=1; c<N; c++)
            {
                // Validation of a right angle triangle. Also validates that side A is less than side B so no triangle is listed twice
                if (a*a + b*b == c*c && a < b)
                {
                    printf("(%d %d %d)\n", a, b, c);
                    if (atan(a*1.0/b) < totalAngle)
                    {
                        totalAngle = atan(a*1.0/b);
                        thinA = a;
                        thinB = b;
                        thinC = c;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }
    if (k > 0)
    {
        printf("The thinnest right-angle triangle is formed by (%d %d %d).\n\n", thinA, thinB, thinC);

    }

The advantage of this approach is that nothing needs to be buffered, there's no allocation of dynamic memory involved, so it's quite simple, but of course the calculations are done twice, and in real life that may not be acceptable. Also note that it's in most cases a whole lot easier to put the \n at the end of a printf, as Basile already pointed out.

The first alternative is to sprintf and strcat the result strings into a char[] variable that's guaranteed to be big enough to contain the maximum length of concatenated results strings. That way you only perform the calculations once, but as N grows that memory structure may grow to huge proportions. Although simple, this approach is only really viable for rather small values of N.

A third alternative is to store the individual result strings in a linked list, allocating a node each time you find a result. Printing them out is just a matter of walking over the linked list, printing out every single node. This is the most efficient and elegant solution that avoids the disadvantages of previous solutions, at the expense of quite some extra code to implement the linked list.

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