Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following compare function that I pass to the std::sort algorithm to sort a vector of objects:

template <typename PointT>
bool myCompareLines (A<PointT>::model_struct model_a, A<PointT>::model_struct model_b) {
    return (/* some comparison code*/);
}

The compare function is declared outside the class and I am calling it like this:

template <typename PointT>
class B {
    [...]
    std::sort(lines.begin().lines.end(),::myCompareLines);
    [...]
}

When I compile I get the error: template declaration of 'bool myCompareLines'

Inside class A I declare class B as a friend class so that class B can access the the private type model_struct. What am I missing?

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by jogojapan, Florent, Pondlife, cadrell0, 0x7fffffff Oct 15 '12 at 17:35

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
myCompareLines is a template, not a function. –  Seth Carnegie Oct 15 '12 at 0:02
    
Thanks for all those who answered, I was missing the typename keyword in signature of myCompareLines. so it should be: –  Mustafa Oct 15 '12 at 1:47
    
bool myCompareLines(typename A<PointT>::model_struct model_a, typename A<PointT>::model_struct model_b) –  Mustafa Oct 15 '12 at 1:48

4 Answers 4

Though hideous, is this what you're looking for? Note: Compiles does not equate to good. Even if this works for you I would suggest an alternate way of declaring your hierarchy.

template<class PointT>
class A
{
public:
    A() {};

    struct model_stuct
    {
        // need something to use in comparison, so i just threw this in.
        int value;
    };
};

// comparitor
template<class PointT>
bool compareLines(
    const typename A<PointT>::model_stuct& left,
    const typename A<PointT>::model_stuct& right)
{
    return left.value < right.value;
}

template<class PointT>
class B
{
public:
    B() : lines() {};

    void sort()
    {
        std::sort(lines.begin(), lines.end(), compareLines<PointT>);
    }

    std::vector<typename A<PointT>::model_stuct> lines;
};


// main entrypoint
int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    // this does nothing, but demonstrate that it can compile and
    //  sort() doesn't puke. 
    B<int> bInt;
    bInt.sort();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for having the only answer that addresses the missing typenames. Online demo –  ildjarn Oct 15 '12 at 0:53

Shouldn't you just do:

template <typename PointT>
class B {
    [...]
    std::sort(lines.begin(), lines.end(), ::myCompareLines<PointT>);
    [...]
}
share|improve this answer
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I was missing the typename keyword in my CompareLines signature.

This fixes it:

bool myCompareLines (typename A<PointT>::model_struct model_a, typename B<PointT>::model_struct model_b)
share|improve this answer

Compiler cannot deduce template param PointT from inner class A<PointT>::model_struct.

It cannot because many specialization of A<PointT> can have identical model_struct - like:

template <class PointT>
class A {
public:
  typedef int model_struct;
};

with this example:

   int a;
   bool res = compareLines(a,a);

Define model_struct as top level template.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.