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C and C++ have many differences, and not all valid C code is valid C++ code.
(By "valid" I mean standard code with defined behavior, i.e. not implementation-specific/undefined/etc.)

Is there any scenario in which a piece of code valid in both C and C++ would produce different behavior when compiled with a standard compiler in each language?

To make it a reasonable/useful comparison (I'm trying to learn something practically useful, not to try to find obvious loopholes in the question), let's assume:

  • Nothing preprocessor-related (which means no hacks with #ifdef __cplusplus, pragmas, etc.)
  • Anything implementation-defined is the same in both languages (e.g. numeric limits, etc.)
  • We're comparing reasonably recent versions of each standard (e.g. say, C++98 and C90 or later)
    If the versions matter, then please mention which versions of each produce different behavior.
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It would help if you provided the compiler versions and compiler command line parameters? –  Marc Feb 23 '09 at 23:52
7  
By the way, it can be useful to program in a dialect which is C and C++ at the same time. I've done this in the past and one one current project: the TXR language. Interestingly, the developers of the Lua language did the same thing, and they call this dialect "Clean C". You get the benefit of better compile time checking and possibly additional useful diagnostics from C++ compilers, yet retain the C portability. –  Kaz Oct 15 '12 at 7:59
7  
I merged the older question into this question since this has more views and upvoted answers. This is still an example of a non-constructive question, but it's quite borderline since yes, it does teach SO users something. I'm closing it as not constructive only to reflect the state of the question before the merge. Feel free to disagree and re-open. –  George Stocker Oct 16 '12 at 0:37
9  
Voting to reopen as I think it can be objectively answered with a "yes" followed by an example (as proved below). I think it is constructive in that people can learn relevant behaviour from it. –  Anders Abel Oct 16 '12 at 15:39
5  
@AndersAbel The pure number of answers, all of which are correct, demonstrates unambiguously that it remains a make-a-list question. There was no way you could have asked this question without getting a list. –  dmckee Oct 16 '12 at 22:19

14 Answers 14

up vote 259 down vote accepted

The following, valid in C and C++, is going to (most likely) result in different values in i in C and C++:

int i = sizeof('a');

UPDATE: Another one from this article:

#include <stdio.h>

int  sz = 80;

int main(void)
{
    struct sz { char c; };

    int val = sizeof(sz);      // sizeof(int) in C,
                               // sizeof(struct sz) in C++
    printf("%d\n", val);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
5  
Definitely wasn't expecting this one! I was hoping for something a little more dramatic but this is still useful, thanks. :) +1 –  Mehrdad Oct 14 '12 at 23:58
6  
+1 the second example is a good one for the fact that C++ doesn't require struct before struct names. –  Seth Carnegie Oct 15 '12 at 0:31
5  
The second example needs std::printf to be valid C++; or don't include <cstdio>. –  Andrey Vihrov Oct 16 '12 at 18:24
2  
@SethCarnegie: A non-conforming program need not fail to work, but it is not guaranteed to work either. –  Andrey Vihrov Oct 16 '12 at 21:35
12  
<cstdio> is allowed to declare ::printf(), but isn't required to. But why the hassle with <cstdio> at all? just include <stdio.h> in both C and C++ and you can remove a couple of lines of code too! –  Sjoerd Oct 16 '12 at 21:44

Here is an example that takes advantage of the difference between function calls and object declarations in C and C++, as well as the fact that C allows the calling of undeclared functions:

#include <stdio.h>

struct f { };

int main() {
    f();
}

int f() {
    return printf("hello");
}

In C++ this will print nothing because a temporary f is created and destroyed, but in C it will print hello because functions can be called without having been declared.

In case you were wondering about the name f being used twice, the C and C++ standards explicitly allows this, and to make an object you have to say struct f to disambiguate if you want the structure, or leave off struct if you want the function.

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3  
Strictly speaking under C this will not compile, because the declaration of "int f()" is after the definition of "int main()" :) –  Sogartar Oct 15 '12 at 11:11
6  
@Sogartar, really? codepad.org/STSQlUhh C99 compilers will give you a warning, but they'll still let you compile it. –  jrajav Oct 15 '12 at 11:29
9  
@Sogartar in C functions are allowed to be implicitly declared. –  Alex B Oct 15 '12 at 11:48
2  
@AlexB Not in C99 and C11. –  user529758 Jan 19 at 22:25
2  
@jrajav Those are not C99 compilers, then. A C99 compiler detects undeclared identifiers as a syntax error. A compiler that doesn't do that is either a C89 compiler, or a pre-standard or another kind of non-conformant compiler. –  user529758 Jan 19 at 22:26

For C++ vs. C90, there's at least one way to get different behavior that's not implementation defined. C90 doesn't have single-line comments. With a little care, we can use that to create an expression with entirely different results in C90 and in C++.

int a = 10 //* comment */ 2 
        + 3;

In C++, everything from the // to the end of the line is a comment, so this works out as:

int a = 10 + 3;

Since C90 doesn't have single-line comments, only the /* comment */ is a comment. The first / and the 2 are both parts of the initialization, so it comes out to:

int a = 10 / 2 + 3;

So, a correct C++ compiler will give 13, but a correct C compiler 8. Of course, I just picked arbitrary numbers here -- you can use other numbers as you see fit.

share|improve this answer
17  
WHOA this is mind-blowing!! Of all possible things I would never have thought comments could be used to change behavior haha. +1 –  Mehrdad Oct 15 '12 at 6:06
57  
even without the 2, it would read as 10 / + 3 which is valid (unary +). –  Benoit Oct 15 '12 at 7:44
6  
Now for fun, modify it so that C and C++ both calculate different arithmetic expressions the evaluate to the same result. –  Ryan Thompson Oct 15 '12 at 9:59
11  
@RyanThompson Trivial. s/2/1/ –  sehe Oct 15 '12 at 11:53

C90 vs. C++11 (int vs. double):

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
  auto j = 1.5;
  printf("%d", (int)sizeof(j));
  return 0;
}

In C auto means local variable. In C90 it's ok to omit variable or function type. It defaults to int. In C++11 auto means something completely different, it tells the compiler to infer the type of the variable from the value used to initialize it.

share|improve this answer
4  
C90 has auto? –  Seth Carnegie Oct 15 '12 at 1:45
3  
Yes: tigcc.ticalc.org/doc/keywords.html#auto –  detunized Oct 15 '12 at 1:47
10  
@SethCarnegie: Yeah, it's a storage class; it's what happens by default when you omit it, so no one used it, and they changed its meaning. I think it's int by default. This is clever! +1 –  Mehrdad Oct 15 '12 at 1:48
17  
@KeithThompson Ah, I guess you mean the inferred int. Still, in the real world, where there is tons of legacy code and the market leader still hasn't implemented C99 and has no intent to do so, talk of "an obsolete version of C" is absurd. –  Jim Balter Oct 15 '12 at 2:42
4  
"Every variable MUST have an explicit storage class. Yours truly, upper management." –  btown Oct 15 '12 at 15:28

Another example that I haven't seen mentioned yet, this one highlighting a preprocessor difference:

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
#if true
    printf("true!\n");
#else
    printf("false!\n");
#endif
    return 0;
}

This prints "false" in C and "true" in C++ - In C, any undefined macro evaluates to 0. In C++, there's 1 exception: "true" evaluates to 1.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. Does anyone know the rationale behind this change? –  antred Sep 2 at 11:50

Per C++11 standard:

a. Difference in the l-value to r-value conversion:

   char arr[100];
   int s = sizeof(0, arr);       // The comma operator is used.

In C++ the value of this expreresion will be 100 and in C this will be sizeof(char*).

b. In C++ the type of enumerator is its enum. In C the type of enumerator is int.

   enum E { a, b, c };
   sizeof(a) == sizeof(int);     // In C
   sizeof(a) == sizeof(E);       // In C++

And at the same time sizeof(int) may not be equal to sizeof(E).

c. In C++ a function declared with empty params list takes no arguments. In C empty params list mean that the number and type of function params is unknown.

   int f();           // int f(void) in C++
                      // int f(*unknown*) in C
share|improve this answer
    
The first one is also implementation-defined like Alexey's. But +1. –  Seth Carnegie Oct 15 '12 at 1:00
1  
@Seth, All material above is taken directly from Annex C.1 of the C++11 standard. –  Kirill Kobelev Oct 15 '12 at 1:13
    
Yes but it is still implementation-defined. sizeof(char*) could be 100 in which case the first example would produce the same observable behaviour in C and C++ (i.e. though the method of obtaining s would be different, s would end up being 100). The OP mentioned that this type of implementation-defined behaviour was fine as he was just wanting to avoid language-lawyer answers, so the first one is fine by his exception. But the second one is good in any case. –  Seth Carnegie Oct 15 '12 at 1:31
    
There is an easy fix -- just change the example to: char arr[sizeof(char*)+1]; int s = sizeof(0, arr); –  Mankarse Oct 15 '12 at 11:49
2  
To avoid implementation-defined differences, you could also use void *arr[100]. In this case an element is the same size as a pointer to the same element, so as long as there are 2 or more elements, the array must be larger than the address of its first element. –  finnw Oct 15 '12 at 12:48
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    printf("%d\n", (int)sizeof('a'));
    return 0;
}

In C, this prints whatever the value of sizeof(int) is on the current system, which is typically 4 in most systems commonly in use today.

In C++, this must print 1.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes, I was actually familiar with this trick, being that 'c' is an int in C, and a char in C++, but it's still good to have it listed here. –  Sean Feb 23 '09 at 23:29
6  
That would make an interesting interview question - especially for people that put c/c++ expert on their CVs –  Martin Beckett Feb 23 '09 at 23:32
2  
Kind of underhanded though. The whole purpose of sizeof is so you don't need to know exactly how large a type is. –  Dana the Sane Feb 23 '09 at 23:37
8  
In C the value is implementation defined and 1 is a possibility. (In C++ it has to print 1 as stated.) –  Windows programmer Feb 24 '09 at 0:06
    
Actually it has undefined behavior in both cases. %d is not the right format specifier for size_t. –  R.. Feb 27 at 20:49

Another sizeof trap: boolean expressions.

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    printf("%d\n", (int)sizeof !0);
}

It equals to sizeof(int) in C, because the expression is of type int, but is typically 1 in C++ (though it's not required to be). In practice they are almost always different.

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2  
One ! should be enough for a bool. –  Alexey Frunze Oct 15 '12 at 14:15

This program prints 1 in C++ and 0 in C:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main(void)
{
    int d = (int)(abs(0.6) + 0.5);
    printf("%d", d);
    return 0;
}

This happens because there is double abs(double) overload in C++, so abs(0.6) returns 0.6 while in C it returns 0 because of implicit double-to-int conversion before invoking int abs(int). In C, you have to use fabs to work with double.

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The C++ Programming Language (3rd Edition) gives three examples:

  1. sizeof('a'), as @Adam Rosenfield mentioned;

  2. // comments being used to create hidden code:

.

int f(int a, int b)
{
    return a //* blah */ b
        ;
}

3) Structures etc. hiding stuff in out scopes, as in your example.

share|improve this answer

An old chestnut that depends on the C compiler, not recognizing C++ end-of-line comments...

...
int a = 4 //* */ 2
        +2;
printf("%i\n",a);
...
share|improve this answer
1  
So, that's only in C89 compilers, not modern ones... –  Jonathan Leffler Feb 24 '09 at 0:20

Inline functions in C default to external scope where as those in C++ do not.

Compiling the following two files together would print the "I am inline" in case of C but nothing for C++.

File 1

#include <stdio.h>

struct fun{};

int main()
{
    fun();  // In C, this calls the inline function from file 2 where as in C++
            // this would create a variable of struct fun
    return 0;
}

File 2

#include <stdio.h>
inline void fun(void)
{
    printf("I am inline\n");
} 

Also, C++ implicitly treats any const global as file scope unless it is explicitly declared extern, unlike C in which extern is the default.

share|improve this answer
    
I really don't think so. Probably you have missed the point. It's not about definition of struct st which is merely used to make the code valid c++. The point is that it highlights different behavior of inline functions in c vs c++. Same applies to extern. None of these is discussed in any of the solutions. –  fayyazkl Oct 15 '12 at 16:01
1  
What is the different behavior of inline functions and extern that is demonstrated here? –  Seth Carnegie Oct 15 '12 at 16:10
    
It is written pretty clearly. "Inline functions in c default to external scope where as those in c++ are not (code shows that). Also C++ implicitly treats any const global as file scope unless it is explicitly declared extern, unlike C in which extern is the default. A similar example can be created for that". I am puzzled - Is it not understandable? –  fayyazkl Oct 15 '12 at 16:12
4  
@fayyazkl The behaviour shown is only because of the difference of lookup (struct fun vs fn) and has nothing to do whether the function is inline. The result is identical if you remove inline qualifier. –  Alex B Oct 15 '12 at 23:36
struct abort
{
    int x;
};

int main()
{
    abort();
    return 0;
}

Returns with exit code of 0 in C++, or 3 in C.

This trick could probably be used to do something more interesting, but I couldn't think of a good way of creating a constructor that would be palatable to C. I tried making a similarly boring example with the copy constructor, that would let an argument be passed, albeit in a rather non-portable fashion:

struct exit
{
    int x;
};

int main()
{
    struct exit code;
    code.x=1;

    exit(code);

    return 0;
}

VC++ 2005 refused to compile that in C++ mode, though, complaining about how "exit code" was redefined. (I think this is a compiler bug, unless I've suddenly forgotten how to program.) It exited with a process exit code of 1 when compiled as C though.

share|improve this answer
    
Your second example using exit, doesn't compile on gcc or g++, unfortunately. It's a good idea, though. –  Sean Feb 24 '09 at 2:55

Another one listed by the C++ Standard:

#include <stdio.h>

int x[1];
int main(void) {
    struct x { int a[2]; };
    /* size of the array in C */
    /* size of the struct in C++ */
    printf("%d\n", (int)sizeof(x)); 
}
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protected by Ashwini Chaudhary Oct 27 '12 at 22:55

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