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I need to create a sorted list adding one item at a time. So I decided to go with LinkedList<T>, Since it is efficient in insert operations. But when finding the proper location, it seems to take much longer time. I am using linear search to get the location. If I use binary search to get the proper location using ElementAt method, will it increase the performance? According to this, still it is a O(n) operation. What do you think? If it is so, is there any other better data structure for the work? Because if I use a different data structure, when inserting a new value to the middle, I will have to shift all the data after that location by one location, which is obviously not desired.

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3 Answers 3

Binary search on a linked list will decrease performance, because binary search requires arbitrary addressability to be O(LogN) efficient.

A better approach is to add everything upfront and do the sorting for O(N*LogN) overall performance.

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Hi dasblinkenlight,Thanks for the reply. But the thing is that I'm not adding all the elements in one shot. So if I am to add the element to the beginning and sort, I will have to repeat the sorting again and again. So, I need a way not to repeat sorting while keeping the list sorted, If there is such a way. –  isuru chathuranga Oct 15 '12 at 1:23
    
@stux If your list is not going to have duplicates, consider using SortedSet<T>. Otherwise, you may consider implementing your own RB-Tree collection, or borrow someone else's implementation. This will keep insertions at O(LogN). –  dasblinkenlight Oct 15 '12 at 1:32
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For your purpose, you would probably be better off with a SortedDictionary class (or perhaps SortedList)

SortedDictionary gives O(log n) insert and retrieval times.

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Hi antlersoft, Thanks for pointing this out. I'll try SortedDictionary and update the thread. –  isuru chathuranga Oct 15 '12 at 1:25
    
One caution: SortedDictionary and SortedList don't support duplicate keys, whereas LinkedList does. –  RickNZ May 1 '13 at 10:59
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Your question has a few misconceptions.

Will a binary search on LinkedList to insert a value into the middle of a sorted value list increase performance?

Binary search makes sense only on a sorted collection. LinkedList<T> isn't one. It's an insertion order respecting collection. To perform a binary search on a LinkedList<T>:

  • you will have to either sort the linked list, which is not only very inefficient (operation on a linked list) but also too much work for mere insertion

  • or you will have to maintain the sort order at the time of insertion itself by inserting in the right position, which is too much work again.

From your question what I understand is that you want a sort order respecting collection but insertions has to faster (unlike O(n) characteristic of say, a typical List<T>). My suggestion would be to use a sorted collection type in .NET. There is a SortedSet<T> in system.dll. That wouldn't let you have duplicates as it is a set, in which case you can implement a custom SortedBag<T> (or SortedList<T> or whatever name) as shown here.

I am using linear search to get the location.

My suggestion is that you dont do that. Let the collection itself find its location to perform an insert. Sorted collection types are best fit here.

If I use binary search to get the proper location using ElementAt method, will it increase the performance

ElementAt method doesn't perform binary search. At best it checks if collection type is an IList<T> and uses the indexer accordingly. No in your case it makes no difference to performance.

when inserting a new value to the middle, I will have to shift all the data after that location by one location, which is obviously not desired .

You're right, inserting in the middle of array based structures like List<T> is an O(n) operation. I'm not sure if you need index operation as well, but that will be costlier. You can either have a sorted collection type with efficient inserts which will have no sense of indexes, or you can have an indexed sorted collection type but insertions will be O(n). Its the trade off you have to pay.

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