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This is my first time implementing Dijkstra's algorithm. Okay so here I have a simple 2D 9 by 9 array:

9 by 9 array

Starting point is 1 and we're trying to get to any green square. Red squares are walls or lava (whatever satisfies your imagination).

How do I implement this in Java?

Computer science is not my field hence I'm not a seasoned programmer so I might not know how to do some stack pushing, only loops and recursion :( please keep it easy as possible and bear with me!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's something similiar that should get you started. However, the solution presented below attempts to get to the bottom right corner. You can relax that condition to find the bottom row. You will also need to change the encoding slightly to have a unique value that represents this row.

public class MazeSolver {

    final static int TRIED = 2;
    final static int PATH = 3;

    // @formatter:off
    private static int[][] GRID = { 
        { 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1 },
        { 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1 },
        { 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 0, 0 },
        { 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1 },
        { 1, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1 },
        { 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1 },
        { 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0 },
        { 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 } 
    };
    // @formatter:off

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        MazeSolver maze = new MazeSolver(GRID);
        boolean solved = maze.solve();
        System.out.println("Solved: " + solved);
        System.out.println(maze.toString());
    }

    private int[][] grid;
    private int height;
    private int width;

    private int[][] map;

    public MazeSolver(int[][] grid) {
        this.grid = grid;
        this.height = grid.length;
        this.width = grid[0].length;

        this.map = new int[height][width];
    }

    public boolean solve() {
        return traverse(0,0);
    }

    private boolean traverse(int i, int j) {
        if (!isValid(i,j)) {
            return false;
        }

        if ( isEnd(i, j) ) {
            map[i][j] = PATH;
            return true;
        } else {
            map[i][j] = TRIED;
        }

        // North
        if (traverse(i - 1, j)) {
            map[i-1][j] = PATH;
            return true;
        }
        // East
        if (traverse(i, j + 1)) {
            map[i][j + 1] = PATH;
            return true;
        }
        // South
        if (traverse(i + 1, j)) {
            map[i + 1][j] = PATH;
            return true;
        }
        // West
        if (traverse(i, j - 1)) {
            map[i][j - 1] = PATH;
            return true;
        }

        return false;
    }

    private boolean isEnd(int i, int j) {
        return i == height - 1 && j == width - 1;
    }

    private boolean isValid(int i, int j) {
        if (inRange(i, j) && isOpen(i, j) && !isTried(i, j)) {
            return true;
        }

        return false;
    }

    private boolean isOpen(int i, int j) {
        return grid[i][j] == 1;
    }

    private boolean isTried(int i, int j) {
        return map[i][j] == TRIED;
    }

    private boolean inRange(int i, int j) {
        return inHeight(i) && inWidth(j);
    }

    private boolean inHeight(int i) {
        return i >= 0 && i < height;
    }

    private boolean inWidth(int j) {
        return j >= 0 && j < width;
    }

    public String toString() {
        String s = "";
        for (int[] row : map) {
            s += Arrays.toString(row) + "\n";
        }

        return s;
    }

}
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I'm personally not to confident in posting code to what is obviously a assignment question. This could reduce the learning effect :) –  Vespasian Oct 15 '12 at 1:03
    
@Vespasian: To be fair, this isn't the full solution. Furthermore, why is that "so obviously an assignment question"? Regardless, there are numerous solutions on the web. –  btiernay Oct 15 '12 at 1:43
    
Didn't want to offend you. sorry if it sounded like this. The image he provided gave me the impression.you are right about the solutions of course. –  Vespasian Oct 15 '12 at 2:04

I would suggest you start with writing down a method of applying dijkstras algorithm (assuming you know it in the first place) here in natural language and then start transforming it to your programming language.

The basic questions you will need to answer for that:

  • What are the nodes?
  • What are the connections?
  • What is the weight of each connection?

Once you did this you should be able to find a (probably not efficient) solution.

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one can find an efficient solution: Dijkstra! see my answer –  Karussell Oct 15 '12 at 9:14

The optimal solution is indeed to use Dijkstra or AStar with a different finish condition. So you need to write if(targetNodes.contains(u)) break; instead of if(target == u) break;

(see wikipedia: If we are only interested in a shortest path between vertices source and target, we can terminate the search at line 13 if u = target.)

This is already implemented in my project called ... oh is this homework ;) ?

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