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python takes list and returns only if negative value also exists using set

I'm having problems with another homework problem.

By using a set, write a method negated(a) that takes a list, a, as an argument and returns a list containing only the elements x such that -x is also in a

His example shows that the input is

[-6, 8, 7, 3, 2, -9, 1, -3, 2, -4, 4, -8, 7, 8, 2, -2, -7, 0, 1, -9, -3, -7, -3, -5, 6, -3, 6, -3, -10, -8]

and the output is

[-6, 8, 7, 3, 2, -3, 2, -4, 4, -8, 7, 8, 2, -2, -7, 0, -3, -7, -3, 6, -3, 6, -3, -8]

I was able to figure out how to do it without using a set with

return [x for x in a if -x in a]

I'm just having problems implementing a set into the problem. Can someone give me the steps to take, how I should tackle the problem... I'm not looking for the complete work, but it would be nice to see how you do it also.

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marked as duplicate by senderle, inspectorG4dget, HackedByChinese, Barmar, mnel Oct 16 '12 at 4:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Your if -x in a bit will involve an O(n) scan of the entire list. Perhaps they want you to try something more efficient (I'm not spelling it out, since you've said it is homework). –  James Henstridge Oct 15 '12 at 1:42
    
set([x for x in a if -x in a]) ...? –  Andy Hayden Oct 15 '12 at 1:43
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's the algorithm that you need to implement:

  1. iterate through all elements in the list
  2. when you consider each individual element, check if its negation exists in the list
  3. if the negation exists in the list, keep it
  4. if the negation does not exist in the list, don't keep it.

It's usually a bad idea to delete elements from a list as you're iterating over it, so it's best to make a new empty list and keep adding (or not) to it.

def filterNegs(L):
    answer = []
    for i in L:
        if -1*i in L:
            answer.append(i)
    return answer

Here's a list comprehension for the same:

return [i for i in a if -1*i in a]

There's a performance issue when you do this though. Checking if an element is in a list is an O(n) operation and O(1) in a set. So, it's better to turn L into a set first:

def filterNegs(L):
    L = set(L)
    answer = []
    for i in L:
        if -1*i in L:
            answer.append(i)
    return answer

Here's a list comprehension for the same:

L = set(L)
return [i for i in a if -1*i in a]

Hope this helps

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thank you! I never wouldve thought about using -1*i. I was able to do the rest by myself. Thanks a lot –  user1730056 Oct 15 '12 at 1:59
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Your code works as is for a set. All you need to do is change the list to a set.

def negate(a) :
  return [x for x in a if -x in a]

a = set()
a.add(1)
a.add(2)
a.add(-1)
print negate(a)

Demo

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