Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
<div n="a">
  . . . 
    . . .
      <spec>red</spec>
      <div n="d">
          . . . 
      </div>
      <spec>green</spec>
      . . .
         <div n="b">
            . . .
              <spec>blue</spec>
            . . .
         </div>
         <div n="c">
           <spec>yellow</spec>
         </div>
      . . .
    . . .
  . . .
</div>

[Edited to remove the ambiguity Sean noticed. -- Thanks]

When the current element is <div n="a">, I need an XPATH expression that returns the red and green elements, but not the blue and yellow ones, as .//spec does.

When the current element is <div n="b">, the same expression needs to return the blue element; when <div n="c">, the yellow element.

Something like .//spec[but no deeper than another div if there is one]

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In XSLT 1.0, assuming that the current node is a div:

.//spec[generate-id(current())=generate-id(ancestor::div[1])]

In XSLT 2.0 under the same assumptions:

.//spec[ancestor::div[1] is current()]

And a pure XPath 2.0 expression:

for $this in .
     return
        $this//spec[ancestor::div[1] is $this]

Full XSLT 1.0 transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="div">
  <div n="{@n}"/>
  <xsl:copy-of select=
   ".//spec[generate-id(current())=generate-id(ancestor::div[1])]"/>
==============
  <xsl:apply-templates/>
 </xsl:template>
 <xsl:template match="text()"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

when applied on the provided XML document:

<div n="a">
  . . .
    . . .
      <spec>red</spec>
      <spec>green</spec>
      . . .
         <div n="b">
            . . .
              <spec>blue</spec>
            . . .
         </div>
         <div n="c">
           <spec>yellow</spec>
         </div>
      . . .
    . . .
  . . .
</div>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<div n="a"/>
<spec>red</spec>
<spec>green</spec>
==============
  <div n="b"/>
<spec>blue</spec>
==============
  <div n="c"/>
<spec>yellow</spec>
==============

Full XSLT 2.0 transformation:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="div">

  <div n="{@n}"/>
  <xsl:sequence select=".//spec[ancestor::div[1] is current()]"/>
===================================
  <xsl:apply-templates/>
 </xsl:template>
 <xsl:template match="text()"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When applied on the same XML document (above), the same correct result is produced:

<div n="a"/>
<spec>red</spec>
<spec>green</spec>
===================================
  <div n="b"/>
<spec>blue</spec>
===================================
  <div n="c"/>
<spec>yellow</spec>
===================================

And using pure XPath 2.0 (no current()):

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>

 <xsl:template match="div">

  <div n="{@n}"/>
  <xsl:sequence select="
    for $this in .
     return
        $this//spec[ancestor::div[1] is $this]"/>
===================================
  <xsl:apply-templates/>
 </xsl:template>
 <xsl:template match="text()"/>
</xsl:stylesheet>

produces the same correct result:

<div n="a"/>
<spec>red</spec>
<spec>green</spec>
===================================
  <div n="b"/>
<spec>blue</spec>
===================================
  <div n="c"/>
<spec>yellow</spec>
===================================
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, Dimitre, I like that. (Yes, the current node would be a div.) So . and current() are the same node. A good use of current()! Why is generate-id needed, though? –  JPM Oct 15 '12 at 3:23
1  
@JPM, In XSLT 1.0 generate-id() is often more efficient than count(.|$ns2) = 1. Also, do see the pure XPath 2.0 expression in the updated answer. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 15 '12 at 3:29
    
Why not just current()=ancestor::div[1]? –  JPM Oct 15 '12 at 3:33
1  
@Dimitre, I am not sure your XSLT 1.0 solution is correct. Would you have a look at how it applies to Test Case 1 as I have included in my addendum? –  Sean B. Durkin Oct 15 '12 at 3:36
1  
Sean is right that I wasn't fully clear. Dimitre is right on what I intended. I have edited the Q accordingly. –  JPM Oct 15 '12 at 11:38

Assuming that you are using XSLT 1.0, and you want to select `spec' children, all children, then with your desired 'current' node as the XSLT focus node, set the following variable...

<xsl:variable name="divs" select="*//div" />

Now you can select all spec descendants which are not preceded by a div descendant with this XPath expression...

//spec[not((preceding::div|ancestor::div)[count(. | $divs) = count($divs)])]

Caveat

This should work, but I have not tested it. With this caution, I leave it as an exercise to the OP to test.

Note

If you really desperately want an XPath expression that does not require you to declare an additional variable, AND you happen to be lucky enough that you already hold the current node in a node-set (lets call it $ref), the you could use this rather inefficient XPath expression...

$ref//spec[not((preceding::div|ancestor::div)[count(. | $ref/*//div) =
                                              count(    $ref/*//div)  ])]

Addendum

Here is a test case that I may be referring to the comment streams.

Test Case 1 Input:

<div n="a">
      <spec>red</spec>
      <div n="x"/>
      <spec>green</spec>
      <div n="b">
        <spec>blue</spec>
      </div>
      <div n="c">
        <spec>yellow</spec>
      </div>
</div>

Test Case 1 Expected output:

  • Should be just red
share|improve this answer
    
SeanB.Durkin, The OP clearly uses the term "descendant", not "sibling". Thereforeyour Test Case 1 is not relevant to this question, as one of the div elements is self-closing and doesn't have any spec descendants. –  Dimitre Novatchev Oct 15 '12 at 4:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.