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I am trying to solve the following problem

Declare a generic delegate type Action that has return type void and takes as argument a T value. This is a generalization of yesterday’s delegate type IntAction. Declare a class that has a method

static void Perform<T>(Action<T> act, params T[] arr) { ... }

This method should apply the delegate act to every element of the array arr. Use the foreach statement when implementing method Perform<T>.

My code looks like this so far:

namespace CSharpexercices
{
    public delegate void Action<T>(T value);

    public class GenericDelegate
    {
        static void Perform<T>(Action<T> act, params T[] arr)
        {
            foreach (T i in arr)
            {
               act(arr[i]);
            }
        }
    }
}

It's not working properly and I got lost with the part "this is a generalization of yesterday's delegate type IntAction.

Could someone help me pretty please :)

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Can you edit your question with the code you use to call Perform? –  nick_w Oct 15 '12 at 2:49

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

IntAction is a delegate type (a type that represents a reference to a method, like a function pointer in C++).

Most likely your instructor declared it as follows:

public delegate void IntAction(int input);

And as thus it represents a method that takes in an int and returns void. To generalize this, YOUR HOMEWORK asks you to make a generalization of such a delegate. It wants you to create a method that takes an object of ANY TYPE, let's say type T, and returns void. That's indeed the delegate System.Action like you used but I think you're homework asks you to DECLARE that delegate type. This is how you do it (I called the delegate GenericAction and you would use it in exactly the same way you use Action):

public delegate void GenericAction<T>(T input);

There is a mistake in your foreach loop. You are trying to assign the result of applying the delegate to an element in an array. But the delegate Action returns void!

To fix this change

arr [i] =  act (arr[i]);

to

act (i); //you can't use the result of applying act to i (because it's void) so just leave it.

Feel free to modify your question or comment if you need more clarification.

share|improve this answer
    
I am not going to school for this MZN, I am not cheating in any way, just trying to understand since I was stuck. –  Sonia Brami Oct 15 '12 at 3:02
    
Hahah it totally looked like home work. I'm sorry, I was just kidding. Does this answer help though? –  Mzn Oct 15 '12 at 3:05
    
:) I found that exercice sheet online , don't be sorry, Thank You for the help :P –  Sonia Brami Oct 15 '12 at 3:11
    
yes I am still trying to put everything together .. so I should use a for loop and then he was mentioning a foreach loop –  Sonia Brami Oct 15 '12 at 3:15
    
Oh, you brought my attention to another error! "i" in the foreach loop will represent the values in the params array one by one and so we don't need to use the indexer ([]). So the correct way is to call act(i). I will edit the answer. –  Mzn Oct 15 '12 at 3:45

What if you changed

arr[i] = act(arr[i]);

To

act(arr[i]);

Remember that act returns void, so you there is no return value to assign.

This is a generalization of yesterday's delegate type IntAction.

What this is likely referring to is a similar method where you were calling an Action<int> act rather than Action<T> act.

Edit: And of course the iteration through arr should be:

for (T obj in arr) 
{ 
    act(obj); 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think your edit is what @FurganSafdar meant--foreach is much better than for especially because it avoids the use of .Count() in the loop. –  Jim D'Angelo Oct 15 '12 at 3:19
    
@JamesD'Angelo I think I'll do another edit - that edit was initially in response to the fact that I had not covered off the foreach loop that is wrong in the question. –  nick_w Oct 15 '12 at 3:23
    
No worries. Good fix! –  Jim D'Angelo Oct 15 '12 at 3:25

Action has no return type so you cannot do anything similar

arr[i] = act(arr[i]);

Secondly, you cannot iterate int datatype in foreach.

EDITED

public delegate void Action<T>(T value);

public class GenericDelegate
{
    static void Perform<T>(Action<T> act, params T[] arr)
    {
        foreach (T obj in arr)
        {
            act(obj);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Or foreach (T obj in arr) { act(obj); } –  Tanzelax Oct 15 '12 at 3:11
    
Yea that can also be done. –  FSX Oct 15 '12 at 3:12
1  
I would avoid using .Count() in for loops. (See this article for more information.) –  Jim D'Angelo Oct 15 '12 at 3:15
    
+1 but you forgot to change it to foreach from your previous example. =D –  Jim D'Angelo Oct 15 '12 at 3:20
    
Thanks for reminding :) –  FSX Oct 15 '12 at 3:22

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