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I was wondering if you had two class identifiers going, if both of them affected the code in between them or if something else happens. Example code:

.
.
.
<div class='class1'>
<div class='class2'>
<p>Example statement</p>
</div>
</div>

CSS:

.class1 {
           margin-right: 10px;
}

.class2 {
           margin-left: 10px;
}

Would that make it so the text has both a 10px right and left margin? Any help would be appreciated.

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3  
Why don't you just try it and see? – j08691 Oct 15 '12 at 2:59
up vote 1 down vote accepted

No, only the class(es) applied on that element are used for the selectors.

However, using your example HTML, you can specify that you want only elements of class2 which are children of class1:

.class1 > .class2 {
  margin-left: 10px;
}

or elements of class2 which are descendants of class1:

.class1 .class2 {
  margin-left: 10px;
}

Information on the difference can be found here: http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/selector.html#descendant-selectors

In order to make the paragraph have both left and right margins, you could use the following:

.class1 p {
  margin-right: 10px;
}

.class2 p {
  margin-left: 10px;
}

The first says that paragraphs which are descendants of a class1 element should have the right margin, and the second applies a left margin to paragraphs which are descendants of class2. Since the paragraph in your example meets both criteria it will have both formats applied.

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Wait, in the first example, will class 2 have all of class one's elements or the other way around? – Elias Benevedes Oct 15 '12 at 3:12
    
Updated the answer to clarify. Note that "element" refers to an object in the HTML such as <div> or <p>; I assume you meant to ask whether it would have the "styles" applied. – Toby J Oct 15 '12 at 3:21
    
Also note that there is no way in CSS to specify that one class should have all of another class's styles. This is a long-standing limitation of CSS. – Toby J Oct 15 '12 at 3:22

It depends entirely on the type of style you're applying. If those two div styles were say font-family on class1 and font-size on class2 then yes the text would inherit them. Margin is one of the ones that is only applied to the actual element it's specified on (although the text would fit inside those divs and would essentially have a left and right margin of 10px because the div contains the text pushing it within it's own margins.)

CSS has a specific order in which it's applied too, so let's say those two divs had their color attribute set to different colors. The text would get the color of class2 since it is the last line read in the CSS and would over ride anything written in class1 that conflicted.

There are a lot of things that affect this such as whether it is an id or a class selector, if it's inline or not etc. Here is an article to explain the order of specificity. http://coding.smashingmagazine.com/2007/07/27/css-specificity-things-you-should-know/

And here is an article on inheritance which was your actual question. http://www.webdesignfromscratch.com/html-css/css-inheritance-cascade/

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