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I have used mysql to join three tables and print the data in an HTML table. My query looks like this:

SELECT nid, title, cid, lid, street, city, state, cat_name, cat_icon 
FROM 
    node 
    JOIN location USING(nid) 
    LEFT JOIN categories USING(cid) 
ORDER BY nid DESC LIMIT 10

Then I print the data into a nice HTML table.

This works good to display my data, but I was curious how I might go about editing a result. Basically a business has data in the 'node' table and its address info in 'location'.

I was going to make a modal or inline edit form but I was curious how you would even update the data since it came from multiple tables?

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closed as not a real question by Jake McGraw, BNL, Conrad Frix, the Tin Man, cHao Oct 16 '12 at 2:30

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
You've just described a whole CRUD (create, read, update, delete) app, check out developerdrive.com/2012/06/… –  Jake McGraw Oct 15 '12 at 3:14
    
That link is very helpful, thank you –  Jay Oct 15 '12 at 3:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
UPDATE node JOIN location USING(nid) LEFT JOIN categories USING(cid) 
SET    node.col1 = newvalue

As stated in mysql manual, multiple-table UPDATE statements can use any type of join permitted in SELECT statements, such as LEFT JOIN.

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Just what I needed, thanks –  Jay Oct 15 '12 at 3:48

[table_Business] BusinessID NodeID LocationID BusinessName BusinessDescription

[table_Node] NodeID NodeName NodeDescription

[table_Location] LocationID LocationName LocationDescription

Relations between tables is what allows you to modify/delete/add your data. Relationships are dictated by identifiers (IDs). In this above case, the primary table is table_Business. One business has one Node and one Location, which makes table_Node and table_Location secondary tables in the relationship diagram. For one business we can have data in all three tables: table_business table_node, table_location but even if data is spread about we can still modify/reference it as long as we have something to identify it by. This is where businessID, nodeID or locationID come into play.

By knowing the NodeID we can modify one specific node of one business.

By knowing the LocationID we can modify one specific location of one business.

By knowing the BusinessID we can modify one specific business, one specific data and one specific location of one business.

(Based on BusinessID we can get LocationID or NodeID by selecing them from table_Business. We can then use LocationID, NodeID to modify information in table_Location, table_Node respectively)


Here's the same data with a different relational definition

[table_Business] BusinessID NodeID BusinessName BusinessDescription

[table_Node] NodeID NodeName NodeDescription

[table_Location] LocationID BusinessID LocationName LocationDescription

Notice here, LocationID has been removed from table_Business and BusinessID appears in table_Location. By doing this we can have more than one location for a business. In case you're storing KFC type businesses, having the ability to define multiple location would be helpful.

By knowing the NodeID we can modify one specific node of one business.

By knowing the LocationID we can modify one specific location of one business.

By knowing the BusinessID we can modify one specific business, one specific node but NOT one specific location for one business.

(If we are to use BusinessID to modify location data we would end up modifying all locations for that business. We need to LocationID in this case)

A relation is defined as a set of tuples that have the same attributes. A tuple usually represents an object and information about that object. Objects are typically physical objects or concepts. A relation is usually described as a table, which is organized into rows and columns. All the data referenced by an attribute are in the same domain and conform to the same constraints. The relational model specifies that the tuples of a relation have no specific order and that the tuples, in turn, impose no order on the attributes. Applications access data by specifying queries, which use operations such as select to identify tuples, project to identify attributes, and join to combine relations. Relations can be modified using the insert, delete, and update operators. New tuples can supply explicit values or be derived from a query. Similarly, queries identify tuples for updating or deleting. It is necessary for each tuple of a relation to be uniquely identifiable by some combination (one or more) of its attribute values. This combination is referred to as the primary key.

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Thank you for the well thought out explanation. My tables look like this: node: nid, title, cid location: nid, lid, street, city, state category: cid, cat_name, cat_icon I am able to reference the needed data using joins, I was just unsure about submitting updates when the data comes from 3 places –  Jay Oct 15 '12 at 14:34

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