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I am learning about javascript from the book "JavaScript Bible", but I have some difficulties. I'm trying to understand this code:

function checkIt(evt) {
    evt = (evt) ? evt : window.event
    var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : evt.keyCode
    if (charCode > 31 && (charCode < 48 || charCode > 57)) {
        status = "This field accept only numbers."
        return false
    }
    status = ""
    return true
}

Someone can explain to me?

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1  
Your question is too vague. What specifically do you want an explanation about? –  Russell Davis Oct 15 '12 at 4:52
7  
I can't believe somebody would publish a book that promoted writing JavaScript code without semi-colons. I hope this is from the chapter entitled Horrible example code that should never be imitated. –  jahroy Oct 15 '12 at 4:55
    
To answer your question, it looks like it's code that is intended to validate input to ensure that only numbers are entered. Keep reading your book for more information ;) –  jahroy Oct 15 '12 at 4:55
    
lol @jahroy, but I have to agree relying on ASI is not a natural thing for most developers and worse of all, makes it look like CoffeeScript (even though "compiled" CS does add semi-colons to the JS). –  Fabrício Matté Oct 15 '12 at 4:58
    
I think the obvious difficulty is in evt = (evt)? ... structure, which basically is because javascript functions can be called with any number of parameters. That sentence checks if evt was assigned a value by caller; if not, it takes "window.event" as the parameter. The second similar thing is because the objects in javascript are very dynamic. Window.event can have 'keyCode' or 'which' or whatever methods. Thus it takes 'which' the primary attribute to get the value from -- if it's present and if which doesn't evaluate to false. –  Aki Suihkonen Oct 15 '12 at 4:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I assume that you just want us to explain what the code does. If so, see below:

// Create a function named checkIt, which takes an argument evt.
function checkIt(evt) {

    // If the user has passed something in the argument evt, take it.
    // Else, take the window.event as evt.
    evt = (evt) ? evt : window.event;

    // Get the Character Code. It can be either from evt.which or evt.keyCode,
    // depending on the browser.
    var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : evt.keyCode;

    // If the Character is not a number, the do not allow the user to type in.
    // The reason for giving 31 to 48 and greater than 57 is because, each key
    // you type has its own unique character code. From 31 to 48, are the numeric
    // keys in the keyboard.
    if (charCode > 31 && (charCode < 48 || charCode > 57)) {

        // Give a status informing the user.
        status = "This field accept only numbers.";

        // Prevent the default action of entering the character.
        return false;
    }

    // Clear the status
    status = "";

    // Allow the user to enter text.
    return true;
}

ASCII Code Reference

PS: I edited your code adding semi-colons ; which were missing.

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Should add that the 31, 48, and 57 are decimal values for characters. See Ascii table. It also would have made more sense to check if the code is a number than checking a limited number of ascii codes to see if it is not. –  sachleen Oct 15 '12 at 5:08
    
Yup, done it! @sachleen. –  Praveen Kumar Oct 15 '12 at 5:08
    
@ jahroy in the book, this example appeared without the ";". If this is a bad book, could you please point me to good books. I have doubt to understand the whole function. I am beginner in javascript and I am not familiar with window.event or even use "?" / ":". This book has a very superficial approach to the subject and I'm with dificulties to undestand. –  user1746040 Oct 15 '12 at 5:42
    
@user1746040 You can consider checking out this book: JavaScript for Dummies, 2nd Edition by Emily A. Vander Veer, Rich Tennant. –  Praveen Kumar Oct 15 '12 at 5:46

it basically says:

evt = (evt) ? evt : window.event

If "evt" is a value, then carry on otherwise assign window.event to evt. This is a shorthand if statement

var charCode = (evt.which) ? evt.which : evt.keyCode

Make a new variable and if a child of evt ("which") exists then assign it to the newly made variable, if not assign "evt" child; "KeyCode"

if (charCode > 31 && (charCode < 48 || charCode > 57)){
            status = "This field accept only numbers."
            return false
}

if charcode is greater than 31 and charcode is smaller than 48 or bigger than 57, then procede. Assign a string to the var status and returns false which terminates the function ( meaning something went wrong)

status = ""
return true

if all went well in the above statement then assign any empty string to "status" and return true which means everything went well

share|improve this answer
1  
otherwise stop? no, that's not what it says. –  sachleen Oct 15 '12 at 5:05
    
uh yes sorry, i didn't know what window.event meant –  ExceptionSlayer Nov 1 '12 at 7:50

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