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I'm reading Introduction to Algorithms by Cormen et. al. and there in the part where they describe Radix sort, they say:

Intuitively you might sort numbers on their most significant digit, sort each of the resulting bins recursively and then combine the decks in order. Unfortunately since the cards in 9 of the 10 bins must be put aside to sort each of the bins, this procedure generates many intermediate piles of cards that you'd have to keep a track of.

What does this mean? I don't understand how sorting by the MSB would be a problem?

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

They refer to a useful property of an LSD radix sort that since you ensure each sorting step is stable, you only have to run one step for each digit, on the whole array, and you don't have to individually sort any subsets.

To take Michael's example data:

After 0 steps:

170, 045, 075, 090, 002, 024, 802, 066, 182, 332, 140, 144

After 1 step (sort on units):

170, 090, 140, 002, 802, 182, 332, 024, 144, 045, 075, 066

After 2 steps (sort on tens):

002, 802, 024, 332, 140, 144, 045, 066, 170, 075, 182, 090

After 3 steps (sort on hundreds):

002, 024, 045, 066, 075, 090, 140, 144, 170, 182, 332, 802

This property becomes especially useful if you're radix-sorting in binary rather than base 10. Then each sorting step is just a partition into two, which is very simple. At least, it is until you want to do it without using any extra memory.

MSD radix sort works, of course, it just requires more book-keeping and/or a non-tail recursion. It's only a "problem" in that CLRS (in common with other expert programmers) don't like to do fiddly work until it's necessary.

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Consider the following example list to sort: 170, 045, 075, 090, 002, 024, 802, 066, 182, 332, 140, 144

  • Sorting by most significant digit (hundreds) gives:

    • Zero hundreds bucket: 045, 075, 090, 002, 024, 066

    • One hundreds bucket: 170, 182, 140, 144

    • Three hundreds bucket: 332

    • Eight hundreds bucket: 802

  • Sorting by next digit is now needed for numbers in the zero and one hundreds bucket (the other two buckets only contain one item each):

    • Zero tens: 002
    • Twenties: 024
    • Forties: 045
    • Sixties: 066
    • Seventies: 075
    • Nineties: 090
  • Sorting by least significant digit (1s place) is not needed, as there is no tens bucket with more than one number. That's not the case with the one hundreds bucket though (exercise: recursively sort it yourself). Therefore, the now sorted zero hundreds bucket is concatenated, joined in sequence, with the one, three and eight hundreds bucket to give:

    002, 024, 045, 066, 075, 090, 140, 144, 170, 182, 332, 801

You can see that the authors are referring to the intermediate recursive sorting steps, which are not necessary in an LSD radix sort.

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