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I want to know what this line does:

foo || (foo = this.foo)

in the following function definition

someFunction: function(foo)  
{   
    foo || (foo = this.foo);  
    ...  
}
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I wonder if this kind of defaulting operation will ever catch on, I thought I was the only one writing that kind of self-obfuscated code. –  Fabrício Matté Oct 15 '12 at 6:16
    
It's like reading the output of the closure compiler. –  Dan D. Oct 15 '12 at 6:17

5 Answers 5

This is probably more commonly written as:

someFunction: function(foo)  
{   
    foo = foo || this.foo;
    // do something with foo
}

All it does is set the foo parameter to the context's foo instance variable if either:

  • someFunction is called without parameters
  • someFunction is called with a falsy parameter such as false, empty string, 0, null, or undefined.

As an example, let's say that someFunction is defined inside an object literal like so:

var myObject = {
    foo: "default value of foo",
    someFunction: function(foo)  
    {   
        foo = foo || this.foo;
        // do something with foo
    }
}

This way, someFunction's parameter foo falls back to a default value if needed.

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1  
+1 because this is the only accurate and non-misleading answer apart from 1. 2. implying that both must hold, which is nonsensical, but still ;) I'd add an "either" after the if: –  phant0m Oct 15 '12 at 12:53
    
Good catch, updated for clarity. –  Abdullah Jibaly Oct 15 '12 at 16:00

If foo isn't handed to someFunction, or if the value of foo evaluates to false, foo takes this.foo as a 'default' value

edit: It works because many programming languages, including JS, use short-circuit evaluation. If foo evaluates to true, the engine won't bother evaluating the (foo = this.foo) part, since the whole statement is already true.

If foo is false (and remember JS isn't strongly typed, so in this usage that sort of means "isn't supplied"), then the second part is evaluated, and it ends up setting the value of foo.

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If foo isn't handed to someFunction, it takes this.foo as a 'default' value is is horribly misleading! The last sentence rectifies this to some extent, but still. –  phant0m Oct 15 '12 at 12:46
    
From a language perspective, yes, it's not a great explanation. It describes the purpose of the code however - 'allows for default arguments', which its what (I believe) OP wanted. I then tired to address the caveats at a level commensurate to the question. Happy to make any edits you might suggest, of course. –  Ben Graham Oct 15 '12 at 22:25
    
It's just that the argument will be considered omitted even if has been provided in the form of an empty atring or zero for example. So someFunction(0) will not pass zero. I'd just clarify on that sooner, rather than implying it in the last sentence. –  phant0m Oct 16 '12 at 5:23
1  
It's difficult to strike a balance between answering as concisely as possible, and covering important gotchas, caveats, etc. I try to practice describing things in as few words as possible. As the quote goes, “I didn't have time to write a short letter, so I wrote a long one instead.”. Anyhow, thanks for the feedback. Edit made. –  Ben Graham Oct 16 '12 at 5:44
    
That's when I'm glad I don't have to write it. You gave a good point, and my own explanations often get a bit wordy ;) –  phant0m Oct 16 '12 at 6:04

As far as I understand it checks if foo the parameter, is set, and if not, overwrites it with a default (this.foo).

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foo || (foo = this.foo); 

is the same as

if (!!!foo) {
    foo = this.foo;
}
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There is no difference between !!! and !. –  phant0m Oct 15 '12 at 12:48
    
LOL. You really, really, really want to make sure that variable is not not not false, eh? –  deceze Oct 15 '12 at 13:24
1  
Ok, my bad, i despise myself and repent in dust and ashes. –  mumu2 Oct 15 '12 at 14:21
    
having a tripple ! makes any sense? –  Akinza Oct 15 '12 at 16:34
    
@Akinsa: "yes" it's like doing (x == true) == true. And "no" because it's the same as a single ! –  phant0m Oct 16 '12 at 5:20

Generally, foo is a placeholder for a dummy variable.

someFunction: function(foo)
{
    // If foo is null, then foo is assigned with this.foo
    // If not, the original value of foo is taken.
    foo || (foo = this.foo);
}
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Firstly is beside the point and secondly is wrong. –  phant0m Oct 15 '12 at 12:47
    
@phant0m I removed. Is it fine now? I don't get what you said secondly. –  Praveen Kumar Oct 15 '12 at 12:48
    
It's not about the word, I just wanted to point out that it's not important that foo is a dummy variable ;) With secondly, I meant This statement checks if the foo is null or not. which is not correct. –  phant0m Oct 15 '12 at 12:49
    
@phant0m I have removed that statement too. –  Praveen Kumar Oct 15 '12 at 13:17
1  
Have a look at Abdullah Jibaly's answer. The thing is, that foo || x will evaluate to x whenever foo is "falsy". –  phant0m Oct 15 '12 at 13:28

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