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Having trouble coming up with the right combination of semicolons and/or braces. I'd like to do this, but as a one-liner from the command line:

while [ 1 ]
do
    foo
    sleep 2
done
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2  
replace newlines with semicolons. The same works for for loops. –  Tom Aug 17 '09 at 16:34
11  
@Tom: that doesn't always work. after the do, you must have the first command, not a semicolon –  Stefano Borini Aug 17 '09 at 16:38

7 Answers 7

up vote 322 down vote accepted
while true; do foo; sleep 2; done

By the way, if you type it as a multiline (as you are showing) at the command prompt and then call the history with arrow up, you will get it on a single line, correctly punctuated.

$ while true
> do
>    echo "hello"
>    sleep 2
> done
hello
hello
hello
^C
$ <arrow up> while true; do    echo "hello";    sleep 2; done
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76  
+1 for meter and rhyme. It's a great mnemonic: "while true do foo sleep too la di da" :D –  Shabbyrobe Dec 10 '11 at 6:55
    
"if you type it as a multiline (as you are showing) at the command prompt and then call the history with arrow up, you will get it on a single line, correctly punctuated." was not true for me. –  Vincent Scheib Jan 9 '13 at 21:35
    
@VincentScheib, check cmdhist option if you are using bash? –  Alok Singhal Mar 5 '13 at 18:56
2  
@VincentScheib works for me on OS X and Ubuntu. –  Alfo Mar 23 '13 at 14:16
1  
@VincentScheib works for me on CentOS 6 –  jhc Aug 27 '13 at 21:00

It's also possible to use sleep command in while's condition. Making one-liner looking more clean imho.

while sleep 2; do echo thinking; done
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1  
good to know !! –  H_7 Jan 25 '13 at 3:08

Colon is always "true":

while :; do foo; sleep 2; done
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4  
why is colon always true? –  Pineapple Under the Sea Dec 12 '13 at 15:10
1  
@Pineapple Under the Sea: From the bash man page: (in section SHELL BUILTIN COMMANDS) : [arguments] No effect; the command does nothing beyond expanding arguments and performing any specified redirections. A zero exit code is returned. –  Adrian W Jan 17 at 21:45
    
this syntax is recommended as : is part of shell itself i.e. : is a shell builtin command. –  avner Feb 25 at 17:59

You can use semicolons to separate statements:

$ while [ 1 ]; do foo; sleep 2; done
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I like to use the semicolons only for the WHILE statement, and the && operator to make the loop do more than one thing...

So I always do it like this

while true ; do echo Launching Spaceship into orbit && sleep 5s && /usr/bin/launch-mechanism && echo Launching in T-5 && sleep 1s && echo T-4 && sleep 1s && echo T-3 && sleep 1s && echo T-2 && sleep 1s && echo T-1 && sleep 1s && echo liftoff ; done
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You can also make use of until command:

until ((0)); do foo; sleep 2; done

Note that in contrast to while, until would execute the commands inside the loop as long as the test condition has an exit status which is not zero.


Using a while loop:

while read i; do foo; sleep 2; done < /dev/urandom

Using a for loop:

for ((;;)); do foo; sleep 2; done

Another way using until:

until [ ]; do foo; sleep 2; done
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1  
+1 for an alternative solution. –  glen3b Sep 29 '13 at 1:33

If I can give two practical examples (with a bit of "emotion").

This writes the name of all files ended with ".jpg" in the folder "img":

for f in *; do if [ "${f#*.}" == 'jpg' ]; then echo $f; fi; done

This deletes them:

for f in *; do if [ "${f#*.}" == 'jpg' ]; then rm -r $f; fi; done

Just trying to contribute.

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3  
It's easier to say: for f in *.jpg; do echo $f; done –  JKnight Jun 20 '13 at 22:45
1  
@JKnight - for these examples, wouldn't you just do ls -1 *.jpg and rm *.jpg –  Kevin Fegan Jan 19 at 21:31

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