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I do have 2 structures here. main linked list is the word. each node of the word list do have a meaning

typedef struct node{
  char word[20];
  struct node2 *meaning;
  struct node *next;
}word;

typedef struct node2{
  char meaning[100];
  struct node2 *next;
}means;

My problem now is I can't add multiple meanings. I can just add 1 meaning and whenever i try to add, it overwrites the previous meaning instead., how can i do this? this is how i add meaning

word *tmp2=(*head);
means *tmp3;
tmp3=(means *)malloc(sizeof(means));
if(tmp2==NULL){
  printf("\n**List still empty, add a word**\n");
  return;
}
do{
  if(strcmp(tmp2->word,ins)==0){
    tmp2->meaning=tmp3;
    strcpy(tmp3->meaning,mea);
    tmp3->next=NULL;
    printf("\n**You have successfully added a meaning**\n");
    return;
  }
  tmp2=tmp2->next;
}while(tmp2!=NULL);
printf("\n**Word is not on the list, cannot add meaning**\n");
return;
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When you do

tmp2->meaning=tmp3;
strcpy(tmp3->meaning,mea);
tmp3->next=NULL;

You overwrite the meaning in the word element of your struct, and set its next to NULL, so you lose the previous tmp2->meaning forever.

You could easily add it on top of the previous meanings :

tmp3->next = tmp2->meaning;
strcpy(tmp3->meaning, mea);
tmp2->meaning = tmp3;

If you want to display the meanings :

void display_meanings_of(word *w)
{
  means *m;

  m = w->meaning;
  if (m)
    printf("Meanings of the word %s:\n", w->word);
  else
    printf("The word %s has no meaning.\n", w->word);
  while (m)
  {
    printf(" - %s\n", m->meaning);
    m = m->next;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@eregith how can i view those meanings? i used this snippet: but it only prints the 2 last meanings... code do{ printf("\n-%s\n",tmp->meaning->meaning); tmp->meaning=tmp->meaning->next; }while(tmp->meaning!=NULL); code –  Enzo Oct 15 '12 at 7:59
    
This will also replace the first of the list inside tmp. I'm editing my answer to tell you –  Eregrith Oct 15 '12 at 8:01
    
@eregith, i've applied the changes, it does only print the 1st and last meaning.. –  Enzo Oct 15 '12 at 8:24
    
@vaizaren then you have an error elsewhere. –  Eregrith Oct 15 '12 at 11:50

Here is your problem:

tmp2->meaning=tmp3;
strcpy(tmp3->meaning,mea);
tmp3->next=NULL;

The first line just overwrite the existing pointer, and you set the next pointer to NULL in the last line.

Instead you need to link the new meaning into the list. This is done by setting tmp2->meaning to NULL when creating the word pointer, and use something like

tmp3->next = tmp2->meaning;
tmp2->meaning = tmp3;

strcpy(tmp3->meaning, mea);

Now tmp3 will always be put at the head of the list, and make tmp3->next point to the previous head, or NULL if there were no previous head.

Edit: Function to view meanings:

void show_meanings(word *w)
{
    int i;
    means *m;
    for (m = w->meaning, i = 1; m != NULL; m = m->next, i++)
        printf("Meaning %d: %s\n", i, m->meaning);
}
share|improve this answer
    
how can i view those meanings? i used this snippet: but it only prints the 2 last meanings... code do{ printf("\n-%s\n",tmp->meaning->meaning); tmp->meaning=tmp->meaning->next; }while(tmp->meaning!=NULL); code –  Enzo Oct 15 '12 at 7:58
    
@vaizaren Please see my updated answer –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 15 '12 at 8:02
    
I've applied the changes, it does only print the 1st and last meaning.. –  Enzo Oct 15 '12 at 8:24
    
@vaizaren And you added more than two meanings? In that case something else is wrong. –  Joachim Pileborg Oct 15 '12 at 8:25
    
@joachin pileborg, yes, i've added more than two meanings... only two meanings are being viewed.. i think there is some mistake in adding the meaning.. –  Enzo Oct 15 '12 at 8:28

What are the parameters for this function you are writing? What is (*head)? what is "ins"? what is "mea""?

I think checking and returning after malloc without free-ing up the memory is not a good idea. If you keep adding a meaning into an empty list, the heap will eventually run out of memory.

word *tmp2=(*head);
means *tmp3;
tmp3=(means *)malloc(sizeof(means));
if(tmp2==NULL){
  printf("\n**List still empty, add a word**\n");
  return;
}

Suggested:

word *tmp2=(*head);
means *tmp3;
if(tmp2==NULL){
  printf("\n**List still empty, add a word**\n");
  return;
}
// if tmp2 is not null then we malloc
tmp3=(means *)malloc(sizeof(means));
share|improve this answer
    
if you want to check i can give you the whole code –  Enzo Oct 15 '12 at 9:07

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