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I have been trying to make OOP PHP5 code. But I think my attempts are clumsy. These are my questions:

  • Is their a better, more leaner way to include database config information?
  • Can I somehow get around having to declare $db = new Db() in every function I make?
  • Should I use PEAR as database abstraction layer instead of Mysqli_database.php?

Mysqli_database.php

<?php
class Db {
    private $connection;

    private function open_connection() {
    	if (file_exists('config.inc.php')) {
    		require('config.inc.php');
    	} else {
    		require('../config.inc.php');
    	}
    	try
    	{
    		$this->connection = mysqli_connect($dbhost,$dbuser,$dbpass,$dbname);
    	}
    	catch (Exception $e)
    	{
    		throw $e;
    	}
    }
    private function close_connection() {
    	try
    	{
    		mysqli_close($this->connection);
    	}
    	catch (Exception $e)
    	{
    		throw $e;
    	}
    }
    public function query($query) {
    	try
    	{
    		$this->open_connection();
    		$result = mysqli_query($this->connection,$query);
    		return $result;
    	}
    	catch (Exception $e)
    	{
    		throw $e;
    	}
    	$this->close_connection();
    }
    public function fetchArray($query) {
    	$row = mysqli_fetch_assoc($query);
    	return $row;
    }
    public function count_rows($query) {
    	$row = mysqli_num_rows($query);
    	return $row;
    }
    public function rows_affected() {
    	$row = mysqli_affected_rows($this->connection);
    	return $row;
    }
    public function created_id() {
    	$row = mysqli_insert_id($this->connection);
    	return $row;
    }
}
?>

Test_data.php

<?php
class Test_data {
    public function show_text() {
    	$db = new Db();
    	$sql = $db->query("SELECT * FROM test_table");
    	$row = $db->fetchArray($sql);
    	echo 'This is the output: '.$row['text'];
    }
}
?>

config.inc.php

<?php
$dbname 	= 'database_name';
$dbhost 	= 'localhost';
$dbuser 	= 'database_user';
$dbpass 	= 'database_password';
?>

includes.php

<?php
require_once('config.inc.php');
require_once('Mysqli_database.php');
$db = new Db();
$test_data = new Test_data();
?>

index.php

<?php
require_once('includes.php');
$test_data->show_text();
?>
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The config information is a matter of taste. But it would be better stored in a config object, and retreived in a more OO way then including global variables from another file.

You can get around creating a new object by using the singleton pattern.

The more abstracted layer you choose, the easier it will be to move from one database to another. You can also have a look at PDO.

share|improve this answer
    
right, the config info holding is a matter of taste, I like to use CONSTANTS, then you know that it's not going to change while in the global scope. –  null Aug 17 '09 at 17:29

There are some really common patterns for establishing database connections: Singleton, Factory, and sometimes Registry.

Here's how one might look.

<?php

class DbConn
{
  const CONN_DEV_1  = 'dev.db1';
  const CONN_PROD_1 = 'prod.db1';
  const CONN_DEV_2  = 'dev.db2';
  const CONN_PROD_2 = 'prod.db2';

  protected static $instances = array();

  protected $conn;

  public static function factory( $database, $env )
  {
    $connectionName = "$env.$database";
    if ( !isset( self::$instances[$connectionName] ) )
    {
      switch ( $connectionName )
      {
        case self::CONN_DEV_1:
          $dbname = 'dev1';
          $dbhost = 'localhost';
          $dbuser = 'database_user';
          $dbpass = 'database_password';
          break;
        case self::CONN_PROD_1:
          $dbname = 'prod1';
          $dbhost = 'some.server';
          $dbuser = 'database_user';
          $dbpass = 'database_password';
          break;
        case self::CONN_DEV_2:
          $dbname = 'dev2';
          $dbhost = 'localhost';
          $dbuser = 'database_user';
          $dbpass = 'database_password';
          break;
        case self::CONN_PROD_2:
          $dbname = 'prod2';
          $dbhost = 'some.server';
          $dbuser = 'database_user';
          $dbpass = 'database_password';
          break;
        default:
          throw new Exception( 'Unrecognized database connection!' );
      }
      self::$instances[$connectionName] = new self( $dbhost,$dbuser,$dbpass,$dbname );
    }
    return self::$instances[$connectionName];
  }

  private function __construct( $dbhost, $dbuser, $dbpass, $dbname )
  {
    $this->conn = mysqli_connect( $dbhost, $dbuser, $dbpass, $dbname );
  }

  /* all your other methods here */
}

and in usage

$db1 = DbConn::factory( 'db1', 'dev' );

Obviously the point here is to pull the value for $env from the current application config, wherever that may come from.

now in terms of usage, generally you want to pass/hand functions/classes a database connection, and not make them responsible for establishing the connection themselves. this provides looser coupling. To use your example:

<?php
class Test_data
{
    protected $db;

    public function __construct( DbConn $db )
    {
        $this->db = $db;
    }

    public function show_text()
    {
        $sql = $this->db->query( "SELECT * FROM test_table" );
        $row = $this->db->fetchArray($sql);
        echo 'This is the output: '.$row['text'];
    }
}
?>
share|improve this answer

As for capturing an instance in each function, a DB object like this is the de-facto example given for the Singleton pattern. It really does fit nicely here.

Here's a rough example:

class DB
{

   // Private Constructor so external code cannot directly instantiate
   private function __construct() {  

   }

   public static function instance() {
     static $instance = false;

     if (!$instance)
       $instance = new DB();

     return $instance;

   }

}

And a small variation, if you want to have multiple DB Connections open (to different databases) would be an instance method like this:

public static function instance($dsn) {
   static $instances = array();

   if (!isset($instances[$dsn]))
       $instances[$dsn] = new DB($dsn);

   return $instances[$dsn];

}
share|improve this answer

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