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Gurus,

I want to know how to write a recursive function that prints

1
12
123
1234
...
......

For eg: display(4) should print

1
12
123
1234

Code

#include <stdio.h>

void print(int n)
{
        if(n != 0)
        {
                print(n-1);
                printf("\n");
                print(n-1);
                printf("%d",n);
        }
}
int main()
{
        print(3);
}

Output
1

12

1

123

Issues

I wanted to write a pure recursive (without any loop) function but unable to filter unwanted prints. Hope someone will help me out!!!

Update

Thanks all for the answers.From all the comments which were given it seems like we can write one with only recursion and a loop is required.

share|improve this question
    
You will find in future @Manu that you will get much more help if when you ask a question you can show that you have first tried to do something yourself in code - possibly posting some example of code you have that does not work. As it is your first question here it might be good to read the FAQ stackoverflow.com/faq –  mathematician1975 Oct 15 '12 at 7:16
    
simply put: What Have You Tried –  SparKot ॐ Oct 15 '12 at 7:42
    
How to reopen this question? –  Parity Oct 16 '12 at 9:35
    
@Manu - To reopen a question, after you've updated and fixed the reasons it was closed for then "flag" it for moderator attention. Mark it as other and explain why it should be reopened. –  Mike Oct 16 '12 at 11:31
    
@Manu Will you accept to have two functions, or does it have to be one single function? –  lc. Oct 16 '12 at 11:31

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To define a recursive function, you have to do three things:

  1. Define what the function does. In this case it is printing numbers from 1 up to n.
  2. Define what the recursive call is. What happens the next time around? The easiest way is to think from the bottom up; in this case, on each earlier line, it is printing numbers up to one less than the previous. Therefore, every time you call the function again, you want to call it with one less than the previous number.
  3. Define your stop condition. When should I stop recursing? In this case, once you hit the number 1, this will be your last iteration. This means, we want to call the recursive function until this stop condition is reached - or in other words, while n is greater than 1.

Therefore, we end up with the following algorithm:

function display(n):
    if(n > 1):
        display(n-1);

    print 1..n;
share|improve this answer
    
it is C? I don't think so. –  logoff Oct 15 '12 at 7:01
3  
@logoff No, it's not C; it's an algorithm in pseudocode. It's also not give-me-teh-codez, either; it's an explanation. And a rather good one I believe, especially given the OP only gave a problem description. –  lc. Oct 15 '12 at 7:03
1  
@logoff It is not C but it is recursive –  mathematician1975 Oct 15 '12 at 7:04
1  
It is more important to understand what he is explaining than it is to just get the code written for you. You have to put SOME effort in. Try it out, try some code then look for help. This isn't your own homework page. –  RossC Oct 15 '12 at 10:49
1  
@logoff Work.... they use IE 7. The goggles do nothing! Hopefully updating soon. We'll be dragged kicking and screaming into the 20th century: IE 8 ha. –  RossC Oct 18 '12 at 7:00

EDIT: OK, I improved my answer with the guidelines of @lc.

void print_recursive(unsigned int num) {
    if (num > 1) {
        print_recursive(num - 1);
    }
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < num; i++) {
        printf("%d ", (i + 1));
    }
    printf("\n");
}
share|improve this answer
2  
It works by looping, not recursion as asked for. That is why I have given -1 –  mathematician1975 Oct 15 '12 at 7:05
1  
This is not recursive, which the OP specifically asked for. –  lc. Oct 15 '12 at 7:05
2  
@logoff Also to be honest your comment "Next time try something yourself" is pretty rude particularly as it is his first question asked here. If you do not want to help the OP don't help. –  mathematician1975 Oct 15 '12 at 7:07
2  
@logoff what are you trying to say here? –  mathematician1975 Oct 15 '12 at 7:42
2  
@logoff You seem to be confusing me with the poster of the question I think. –  mathematician1975 Oct 15 '12 at 9:12

We keep calling PrintIt() with the argument-1 recursively until x < 1. Each call will then return in reverse order when x < 1. At each return we print a line starting at 1 to x.

#include "stdio.h"

void PrintIt( int x )
{
    int i;
    if( x > 1 )
    {
        PrintIt( x - 1 );
        printf("\n");
    }

    for( i = 1; i < x+1; i++)
    {
        printf("%d", i);
    }

    return;
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    PrintIt( 4 );
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The last line is printed without a newline. –  Jim Balter Oct 16 '12 at 7:05

The recursive function used here is func(int). Initially the value is passed from the main() program. The recursion occurs till we reach the exit condition , which is val=0 in this case. Once we reach that level , we move the penultimate frame a print "1". The same pattern is followed to attain the sequence "1 2". . . "1 2 3 " . . . "1 2 3 4"

int func(int val){

        int temp,i;

        if( val == 0 )
        {
                val++;
                return val;
        }
        else
        {
                val--;
                temp=func( val );

                for (i=1;i<=temp;i++)
                {
                        printf("%d",i);
                }
                printf("\n");

                temp++;
                return temp;
        }
}

int main(){

        int value=4, result;

        result=func(value);
}
share|improve this answer
3  
Rather than only post a block of code, please explain why this code solves the problem posed. Without an explanation, this is not an answer. –  Martijn Pieters Oct 15 '12 at 7:29
    
@MartijnPieters Thnx for the comment. I've tried to add an explanation –  Antarus Oct 15 '12 at 8:41
    
I dont want loop in the function. –  Parity Oct 16 '12 at 9:41

Just for fun, here's a purely recursive solution. It's in python, which is practically pseudocode anyway. (Non-pythonic newlines are for clarity).

def loop(max, row=1, col=1):
    if col <= row:
        print col,
        loop(max, row, col+1)
    elif row < max:
        print "\n",
        loop(max, row+1, 1)
    else:
        print "\n",
share|improve this answer
#include<stdio.h>
void print_num(int x);
int n;
void main(){
printf("Enter number of lines: ");
scanf("%d",&n);
print_num(1);
}
void print_num(int x){
int i;
for(i=1;i<=x;i++){
printf("%d",i);
 }
if(x<n){
printf("\n");
x++;
print_num(x);
 }
}

This is simple, right?

share|improve this answer

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