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I have a datagrid that is bound to an observable collection.

I'd like to achieve a similar thing shown in this post with my Datagrid but there are additional considerations:

  1. The Datagrid can be resized by the user. Filling the data table with some fixed number of rows does not work for my purposes.
  2. The scrolling behavior should work properly.

Basically I'm trying to make an error list window that is similar to the one inside Visual Studio.

I'd appreciate any guidelines.

share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted
+100

This was a tricky one. My idea would be to create an adorner that will be responsible for drawing the different lines you need. I'm not fond of creating unnecessary row objects.

Here is a starting example (there are still some glitches and it will need tweaking, but I think it's a good start.)

XAML

<Window x:Class="WpfApplication11.MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:sys="clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib"
    xmlns:local="clr-namespace:WpfApplication11"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">

<local:MyDataGrid HeadersVisibility="Column">
    <local:MyDataGrid.Columns>
        <DataGridTextColumn Header="Column 123" Binding="{Binding}" />
        <DataGridTextColumn Header="Column 2" Binding="{Binding}" />
        <DataGridTextColumn Header="Column 33333333333333333333333" Binding="{Binding}" />
    </local:MyDataGrid.Columns>
    <sys:String>Row</sys:String>
    <sys:String>Row</sys:String>
</local:MyDataGrid>

</Window>

Control Code

public static class Visual_ExtensionMethods
{
    public static T FindDescendant<T>(this Visual @this, Predicate<T> predicate = null) where T : Visual
    {
        return @this.FindDescendant(v => v is T && (predicate == null || predicate((T)v))) as T;
    }

    public static Visual FindDescendant(this Visual @this, Predicate<Visual> predicate)
    {
        if (@this == null)
            return null;

        var frameworkElement = @this as FrameworkElement;
        if (frameworkElement != null)
        {
            frameworkElement.ApplyTemplate();
        }

        Visual child = null;
        for (int i = 0, count = VisualTreeHelper.GetChildrenCount(@this); i < count; i++)
        {
            child = VisualTreeHelper.GetChild(@this, i) as Visual;
            if (predicate(child))
                return child;

            child = child.FindDescendant(predicate);
            if (child != null)
                return child;

        }
        return child;
    }
}

public class GridAdorner : Adorner
{
    public GridAdorner(MyDataGrid dataGrid)
        : base(dataGrid)
    {
        dataGrid.LayoutUpdated += new EventHandler(dataGrid_LayoutUpdated);
    }

    void dataGrid_LayoutUpdated(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        InvalidateVisual();
    }

    protected override void OnRender(DrawingContext drawingContext)
    {
        base.OnRender(drawingContext);

        var myDataGrid = AdornedElement as MyDataGrid;
        if (myDataGrid == null)
            throw new InvalidOperationException();

        // Draw Horizontal lines
        var lastRowBottomOffset = myDataGrid.LastRowBottomOffset;
        var remainingSpace = myDataGrid.RenderSize.Height - lastRowBottomOffset;
        var placeHolderRowHeight = myDataGrid.PlaceHolderRowHeight;
        var lineNumber = (int)(Math.Floor(remainingSpace / placeHolderRowHeight));

        for (int i = 1; i <= lineNumber; i++)
        {
            Rect rectangle = new Rect(new Size(base.RenderSize.Width, 1)) { Y = lastRowBottomOffset + (i * placeHolderRowHeight) };
            drawingContext.DrawRectangle(Brushes.Black, null, rectangle);
        }

        // Draw vertical lines
        var reorderedColumns = myDataGrid.Columns.OrderBy(c => c.DisplayIndex);
        double verticalLineOffset = - myDataGrid.ScrollViewer.HorizontalOffset;
        foreach (var column in reorderedColumns)
        {
            verticalLineOffset += column.ActualWidth;

            Rect rectangle = new Rect(new Size(1, Math.Max(0, remainingSpace))) { X = verticalLineOffset, Y = lastRowBottomOffset };
            drawingContext.DrawRectangle(Brushes.Black, null, rectangle);
        }
    }
}

public class MyDataGrid : DataGrid
{
    public MyDataGrid()
    {
        Background = Brushes.White;
        Loaded += new RoutedEventHandler(MyDataGrid_Loaded);
        PlaceHolderRowHeight = 20.0D; // random value, can be changed
    }

    protected override void OnRender(DrawingContext drawingContext)
    {
        base.OnRender(drawingContext);
    }

    private static void MyDataGrid_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
    {
        var dataGrid = sender as MyDataGrid;
        if (dataGrid == null)
            throw new InvalidOperationException();

        // Add the adorner that will be responsible for drawing grid lines
        var adornerLayer = AdornerLayer.GetAdornerLayer(dataGrid);
        if (adornerLayer != null)
        {
            adornerLayer.Add(new GridAdorner(dataGrid));
        }

        // Find DataGridRowsPresenter and set alignment to top to easily retrieve last row vertical offset
        dataGrid.DataGridRowsPresenter.VerticalAlignment = System.Windows.VerticalAlignment.Top;
    }

    public double PlaceHolderRowHeight
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

    public double LastRowBottomOffset
    {
        get
        {
            return DataGridColumnHeadersPresenter.RenderSize.Height + DataGridRowsPresenter.RenderSize.Height;
        }
    }

    public DataGridColumnHeadersPresenter DataGridColumnHeadersPresenter
    {
        get
        {
            if (dataGridColumnHeadersPresenter == null)
            {
                dataGridColumnHeadersPresenter = this.FindDescendant<DataGridColumnHeadersPresenter>();
                if (dataGridColumnHeadersPresenter == null)
                    throw new InvalidOperationException();
            }
            return dataGridColumnHeadersPresenter;
        }
    }

    public DataGridRowsPresenter DataGridRowsPresenter
    {
        get
        {
            if (dataGridRowsPresenter == null)
            {
                dataGridRowsPresenter = this.FindDescendant<DataGridRowsPresenter>();
                if (dataGridRowsPresenter == null)
                    throw new InvalidOperationException();
            }
            return dataGridRowsPresenter;
        }
    }

    public ScrollViewer ScrollViewer
    {
        get
        {
            if (scrollViewer == null)
            {
                scrollViewer = this.FindDescendant<ScrollViewer>();
                if (scrollViewer == null)
                    throw new InvalidOperationException();
            }
            return scrollViewer;
        }
    }

    private DataGridRowsPresenter dataGridRowsPresenter;
    private DataGridColumnHeadersPresenter dataGridColumnHeadersPresenter;
    private ScrollViewer scrollViewer;
}

This specific piece of code

void dataGrid_LayoutUpdated(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    InvalidateVisual();
}

you really don't want. It's the easiest but ugliest way to get OnRender being called when it has to. You should only force OnRender to be called on Column reordering and Column Size changed. Good luck !

share|improve this answer
    
@l46kok : have you had the chance to try this out ? – Sisyphe Oct 18 '12 at 11:43
    
Care to explain DownVote ? – Sisyphe Nov 13 '12 at 17:48
1  
Absolute great solution. Had a little problem with it though: AdornerLayer.GetAdornerLayer(dataGrid); returned null everytime. Fixed it by wrapping the DataGrid in an AdornerDecorator. – christoph Aug 26 '15 at 10:26

I would create a UserControl with a DockPanel that contains two GridViews where the first one is docked to "top" and the second one (with blank rows) would use the remaining space (if any left depending on the number of rows in the first GridView). also a ScrollViewer is needed to implement scrolling across both GridViews.

You could use a DataGrid as well, but then you would need to bind the Column Widths to some common data source since DataGrid does not implement INotifyPropertyChanged on Columns (but GridView does).

An exampel on how this would be implemented follows in the code below (NOTE additional styling would be required to get better GridLines ) Test what happens when you add new objects to the ObjectList. Test with different fixed sizes on you UserControl. Blanks will by "magic" be purged out without scrollbar, but visible when enough space remains.


<Window.Resources>
<x:Array x:Key="ObjectList" Type="{x:Type local:MyDataStructure}">
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="John" Value="13" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="Tom" Value="12" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="John" Value="13" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="Tom" Value="12" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="John" Value="13" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="Tom" Value="12" />
</x:Array>

<x:Array x:Key="Blanks" Type="{x:Type local:MyDataStructure}">
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="" Value="{x:Null}" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="" Value="{x:Null}" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="" Value="{x:Null}" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="" Value="{x:Null}" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="" Value="{x:Null}" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="" Value="{x:Null}" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="" Value="{x:Null}" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="" Value="{x:Null}" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="" Value="{x:Null}" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="" Value="{x:Null}" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="" Value="{x:Null}" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="" Value="{x:Null}" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="" Value="{x:Null}" />
    <local:MyDataStructure Description="" Value="{x:Null}" />
</x:Array>

<GridViewColumnCollection x:Key="columns">
    <GridViewColumn Header="Description" DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding Description}" Width="100" />
    <GridViewColumn Header="Value" DisplayMemberBinding="{Binding Value}" Width="50" />
</GridViewColumnCollection>

<DataTemplate x:Key="RowTemplate">
    <Border BorderBrush="Gray" BorderThickness="1">
    <GridViewRowPresenter Content="{Binding}" Columns="{StaticResource columns}" />
    </Border>
</DataTemplate>
</Window.Resources>

<DockPanel>
<ScrollViewer VerticalScrollBarVisibility="Auto" DockPanel.Dock="Top">
    <ItemsControl DockPanel.Dock="Top">
    <GridViewHeaderRowPresenter Columns="{StaticResource columns}" DockPanel.Dock="Top" />
    <ItemsControl ItemsSource="{StaticResource ObjectList}" ItemTemplate="{StaticResource RowTemplate}" DockPanel.Dock="Top"></ItemsControl>
    </ItemsControl>
</ScrollViewer>
<ItemsControl ItemsSource="{StaticResource Blanks}" ItemTemplate="{StaticResource RowTemplate}"></ItemsControl>
</DockPanel>

  public class MyDataStructure
  {
    public string Description { get; set; }

    public int? Value { get; set; }
  }
share|improve this answer

Fill it with empty objects in the collection, and then overwrite them as you add to the grid. Do some sort of loop check that determines where the latest "empty" row is. you could even grab each non empty object, and run a sort on them and then re-insert them after.

Don't need to use any custom modules, just use some good ol' fashioned logic and for/foreach loops.

share|improve this answer
1  
When I saw the first answers, I was just surprised that nobody gave him this very basic advice. Best solution, clean, does not involve coding neither redefining the DataGrid's default behavior. – Damascus Oct 22 '12 at 18:47
    
Damascus this is not clean solutin. Scroll bar may appear and also rows are selectable. – Evgeny Feb 7 '13 at 16:00

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