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What return and variable type would I need to use to catch the return value of the address of a variable passed into a function?

Say:

RETURNTYPE get_address(int num){
return #
}

int main(){
int num = 1;
DATATYPE = get_address(num);
return 0;
}
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1  
Welcome to the wonderful world of pointers. You've already experienced a common mistake in returning the address of a local variable, causing anything being returned to just be garbage. –  chris Oct 15 '12 at 7:35
    
int omg= 42, * lol= &omg; // lol is of type int* –  nurettin Oct 15 '12 at 7:36
    
Your function is not going to work as expected because num is passed-by-value and a temp copy of num is going to be created. There isn't even a need for a function in this case. Just use & operator to get the address directly. –  ksming Oct 15 '12 at 7:38
    
I guess I should have clarified what I am trying to do. I need access to both addresses at the same time, so would I need to pass int in by value and by reference in order to have both adresses at once? –  user1404053 Oct 15 '12 at 7:40
    
Thanks everybody, I actually asked the wrong question without realizing it. I think what I need to do is pass in a pointer to the int and the int by value and then compare the two address values and return a bool (which will obviously be false) but it's for an assignment. –  user1404053 Oct 15 '12 at 7:44
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5 Answers

RETURNTYPE and DATATYPE should be int*, but note that it does not make much sense to return a pointer to a function argument.

Function argument exists only for as long as the function is executing. Once the function returns that variable no longer exists and using the address returned is essentially undefined behavior.

If you want address of the variable used as argument at the call site then you don't need the function get_address() at all, just use the & operator:

int main(){
  int num = 1;
  int* pnum = #
  return 0;
}
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If you have access to C++11, you can use the built-in std::addressof.

You can implement a generic function that returns the address of the parameter as such:

template<typename T>
T* addr(T& param)
{
   return (T*)&(char&)param;
}

(this is the C++11 implementation, and it's like this because the unary & can be overloaded)

Note that you must pass the parameter by reference otherwise you're returning the address of a local variable, which can result in undefined behavior.

Or you can simply use &. :)

I just need to verify that the address on num is different inside and outside of the function when passed by value.

You can pass the same parameter by value and by reference:

void compareAddresses(int passedByValue, int& passedByReference)
{
   std::cout << &passedByValue << " " << &passedByReference;
}
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@WhozCraig oops :) –  Luchian Grigore Oct 15 '12 at 8:46
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pointer is variable that holds an address. So you need pointer to int.

int* get_address (int num) {
    return &num;
}

int main () {
    int num = 1;
    int* pointer = get_address(num);
    return 0;
}

This above of course won't work because you pass the value by copy, and the variable will be deallocated from the stack and the pointer will be invalidated.

If you need a function you should pass it by reference (this will return the correct pointer address of the variable):

int* get_address (int &num) {
    return &num;
}

Though you don't need a function. It's a bit excessive. That works just fine:

int* pointer = &num;
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k. And then the pointer will hold the address of the variable inside of the function? I just need to verify that the address on num is different inside and outside of the function when passed by value. I guess I am used to c and having to catch addresses with char * if I remember right –  user1404053 Oct 15 '12 at 7:38
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You can't, or rather I should say you shouldn't return the address of local scoped variables, as they no longer exist after the function returns. Therefore, you're getting only garbage.

int num = 1;
int* addr = &num;

In C++11 you can use auto when you don't know the type, but you cannot return auto from a function.

auto num = 1;
auto addr = &num;
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The local variable gets destroyed after the function has finished. The function call might get over written by other function calls. You wont get what you want. So you shouldn't return a pointer to the local variable of a function.

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