Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on this script that lets you build regex with interpolated variables. At the moment I got this and it works beautifully:

function sRegExp( regex, vars ) {
  vars = Array.prototype.slice.call( arguments, 1 );
  regex = regex.toString();
  var newRegex = regex.replace(/(^\/|\/$|\/([igm]+)$)/g, '')
    .replace( /#\{(\d)\}/g, function( a, b ) { return vars[ +b ]; });
  var mods = regex.match( /\/([igm]+)$/ );
  return new RegExp( newRegex, mods ? mods[1] : '' );
}

And I use it like so:

function func() {
  var foo = 'lol';
  return sRegExp( /baz #{0}/i, foo );
}

console.log( func() ); //=> /baz lol/i

I want to improve this script by using the variable name instead of having to use an index and pass in the variables as params so I thought of using eval, so I got rid of vars and refactored the code a bit:

function sRegExp( regex ) {
  regex = regex.toString();
  var newRegex = regex.replace(/(^\/|\/$|\/([igm]+)$)/g, '')
   .replace( /#\{(\w+)\}/g, function( a, b ) { return eval( b ); });
                 __^__                               __^__
  var mods = regex.match( /\/([igm]+)$/ );
  return new RegExp( newRegex, mods ? mods[1] : '' );
}

The problem now with the previous example is this:

console.log( func() ); //=> foo is not defined

But in the global scope...

var foo = 'lol';
function func() {
  return sRegExp( /baz #{foo}/i );
}

console.log( func() ); //=> /baz lol/i

How can I set the context of eval. I tried eval.call(func) but this obviously didn't work. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'm no fan of eval nor of cluttering the global space. So, my answer is biased.

You can pass the named variables as a parameters.

function func() {
  return sRegExp( /baz #{foo}/i, { foo: "lol" } );
}

And

function sRegExp( regex, vars ) {
  ...
  var newRegex = regex.replace(/(^\/|\/$|\/([igm]+)$)/g, '')
      .replace( /#\{(\w+)\}/g, function( a, b ) { return vars[b]; });
  ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, this is a good idea, still verbose but I like. Seems like my awesome idea is not that awesome anymore ... –  elclanrs Oct 15 '12 at 8:01
    
@elclanrs, well, if you still want to stick with using the global scope then you can make use of window –  Alexander Oct 15 '12 at 12:19
add comment

You cannot set the scope of eval. It inherits the local execution context, and thus only sees what its calling context sees (in this case, within func). Unfortunately there is no way round this.

When control enters an execution context for eval code, the previous active execution context, referred to as the calling context, is used to determine the scope chain, the variable object, and the this value. If there is no calling context, then initialising the scope chain, variable instantiation, and determination of the this value are performed just as for global code.

From: ES 3.1 10.2.2 Eval Code

share|improve this answer
    
So the only way around it I found is if I use this.foo = 'lol' then eval will output the correct value but this is not ideal. There must be a way to do what I want to do, but how? –  elclanrs Oct 15 '12 at 7:54
    
Just realized it works because this is window... Arrg, seems like there's no way around it. –  elclanrs Oct 15 '12 at 7:59
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.