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I tried to search it on Google but could not find any relevant link. If there is any reference to this problem, it will suffice.

The 2n numbers, each number from 1 to n twice are to be arranged in a sequence such that number k has exactly k numbers between it. Is it possible to find such arrangement for any n? What can be a general strategy to find such sequence for some n.

For example,
n = 3 --> 231213
n = 4 --> 41312432

I found them just by hit and trial but was not able to find for n = 5 and 6.

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closed as off topic by Raymond Chen, lc., bensiu, 0x7fffffff, stealthyninja Oct 16 '12 at 6:11

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k is known or you need to search for any number? –  Anshu Oct 15 '12 at 8:04
1  
This does not appear to be a programming question. Suggest moving to math.stackexchange.com –  Raymond Chen Oct 15 '12 at 8:12
    
I think there is no solution for N=1 ? you have the number 1, 1, 2, 2 and no solution? –  Alan Oct 15 '12 at 8:17

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

See here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Langford_pairing for more information. Especially: "Langford pairings exist only when n is congruent to 0 or 3 modulo 4; for instance, there is no Langford pairing when n = 1, 2, or 5." implies that you're out of luck for n = 5 and n = 6.

See http://oeis.org/A014552 for the number of solutions for a given n.

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Thanks for the link. I am surprised there is even a term associated to it. –  Shashwat Kumar Oct 15 '12 at 9:34

There are no such sequences for arbitrary n as can easily be verified by exhaustive search for n 2, 5 or 6:

def check(t, n): 
  for i in range(1, n + 1): 
    p1 = t.index(i)
    p2 = t.index(i, p1 + 1)
    if p2 - p1 != i + 1:
      return False
  return True

assert check((2, 3, 1, 2, 1, 3), 3)
assert check((4, 1, 3, 1, 2, 4, 3, 2), 4)

def allseqs(n):
  if n > 1:
    for seq in allseqs(n - 1): 
      for i in range(len(seq) + 1): 
        for j in range(i, len(seq) + 1): 
          yield seq[:i] + (n,) + seq[i:j] + (n,) + seq[j:]
  else:
    if n == 1:
      yield (1, 1)
    else:
      yield ()

def findseqs(n):
  for p in allseqs(n):
    if check(p, n): 
      print p

The results for n=2, 3, 4, 5:

>>> findseqs(2)
>>> findseqs(3)
(2, 3, 1, 2, 1, 3)
(3, 1, 2, 1, 3, 2)
>>> findseqs(4)
(2, 3, 4, 2, 1, 3, 1, 4)
(4, 1, 3, 1, 2, 4, 3, 2)
>>> findseqs(5)
>>> findseqs(6)
>>> 

There is quite a few solutions for n=7 but the exhaustive search takes a few minutes.

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