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If the following code works (which certainly does)

$( 'html, body' ).animate(
    {
        "scrollTop": "500"
    }, 
    500
);

then why doesn't the following code work?

$( window ).animate(
    {
        "scrollTop": "500"
    }, 
    500
);

If the following code works

$( window ).scroll( myScrollFunctionHandler );

then why doesn't the following code work?

$( 'html, body' ).scroll( myScrollFunctionHandler );

Can somebody please make a comprehensive explanation as to why this has to be this way?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

window does not have a scrollTop property, which is why your first example doesn't work. document.body does.

As to your second example, $(window).scroll is the event handler installer for window.onscroll. There is no "body onscroll" event, so obviously an event handler installed on the body (or html) element won't be invoked, as events do not bubble down the DOM, but only up.

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what do you mean it's not standard? Nope, it accepts a callback function that will be used when the selected object is scrolled. –  supertonsky Oct 15 '12 at 8:38
    
I was wrong about the $.scroll - that's a scroll handler, not a scroll function (like scrollTo, which I was confusing it for). The reason for the discrepancy is that the onscroll event fires on the window object, not the body element. –  Chris Heald Oct 15 '12 at 8:42

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