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I just read about what send does in Ruby and I'm still confused when looking at this code (it's from a quiz but its past due date anyways)

x = [1,2,3]
x.send :[]=,0,2
x[0] + x.[](1) + x.send(:[],2)

I understand that the first line assigns an array to x then I don't understand what :[] = ,0,2 does at all and i dont understand why send is needed there I dont get what x.[](1) does and x.send(:[],2) do on the last line

I'm really confused and I just cant find this information online.

I found the what send does but I'm still a little bit confused and a lot of bit confused about this code as a whole.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 47 down vote accepted

First of all, things like [] (array index) and []= are just methods in Ruby. x is an Array, and arrays have a []= method, which accepts two arguments, an index and a value to set.

Using send lets you pass an arbitrary "message" (method call) to object, with arbitrary parameters.

You could call x.send :sort, for example, to send the "sort" message to the array. Sort doesn't need any parameters, though, so we don't have to pass anything extra to it.

x#[]=, on the other hand, accepts two arguments. Its method can be thought of to look like this:

def []=(index, value)
  self.set_value_at_index(index, value)
end

So, we can just invoke it with send :[]=, 0, 2, which is just like calling x[0] = 2. Neat, huh?

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alright I still dont understand the comma why isnt it :[]= 0,2 ?? –  Xitcod13 Oct 15 '12 at 8:57
1  
btw its pretty neat but confusing as hell. :P –  Xitcod13 Oct 15 '12 at 8:57
7  
@Xitcod13 Because :[]= is an argument of send, too: send(:[]=, 0, 2) –  Eureka Oct 15 '12 at 8:59

In Ruby a[0] = 2 is actually syntaxic sugar for a.[]=(0, 2).

Knowing this, that's what your second line do: Calling the []= method with two arguments using metaprogramming, as your correctly guessed.

This is the same for your third line: a[0] is syntaxic sugar in Ruby for x.[](0).

The following code is a simpler equivalent to your example:

x = [1, 2, 3]
x[0] = 2
x[0] + x[1] + x[2]
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very good answer as well thanks –  Xitcod13 Oct 15 '12 at 9:03

Don't worry. Ruby can be a little bit tricky in these cases. Let's examine the code line by line:

x = [1,2,3]
x.send :[]=,0,2
x[0] + x.[](1) + x.send(:[],2)

First line

First line is clear to you: it assigns an array of three elements to x. And that's just about it.

Second line

Second line calls the Object#send method of x passing a symbol (remember that everything that starts with : is a symbol in ruby) :[]=, 0 (a Fixnum) and 2 (another Fixnum).
Now you just have to take a look at what the send method does (as you said you've already done):

Invokes the method identified by symbol, passing it any arguments specified

This means that it will invoke the method identified by :[]= and pass 0 and 2 to it. Now let's take a look at the Array#[]= method. This method definition (which can be overloaded by you if you need to do so) is:

class Array
    # ...
    def []=(a, b)
        # ...
    end
end

This method is called by send as x.[]=(0, 2) which is pretty ugly if you ask me. That's why Ruby defines a syntactic sugar version: x[0] = 2 and in general:

x.[]=(a, b)  -->  x[a] = b

In the Array case we also have the following:

x.[](a)  -->  x[a]

In both cases you are free to call whatever version makes sense to you in the specific context.

Third line

Now for the third and last line:

x[0] + x.[](1) + x.send(:[],2)

things gets really tricky. Let's divide it into:

  1. x[0]
  2. x.[](1)
  3. x.send(:[], 2)

The first one is pretty straight forward. It returns the first element of the array.

The second one is the syntactic sugar that we have seen earlier which can be basically be converted into x[1] which returns the second element of the array.

The third one uses Object#send to call the method [] passing 2 to it. Which means that it calls x.[](2) which means x[2].

Conclusion

The code

x = [1,2,3]
x.send :[]=,0,2
x[0] + x.[](1) + x.send(:[],2)

can be converted using:

x.send(:[]=, a, b)  -->  x.[]=(a, b)
x.send(:[], a)  -->  x.[](a)
x.[]=(a, b)  -->  x[a] = b
x.[](a)  -->  x[a]

to:

x = [1,2,3]
x[0] = 2
x[0] + x[1] + x[2]

which can be reduced to:

2 + 2 + 3

which results in:

7
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@Jeffery Nice explanation..Can u please explain how x[1]=2 –  Catmandu Oct 8 '13 at 19:30
1  
@PeeVee, The element with index 1, in the array x, is the second: 2. –  Jefffrey Oct 8 '13 at 20:32
    
@Jeffery..Yeah got it..Thanks for the explanation. –  Catmandu Oct 9 '13 at 1:23

send is a way to achieve reflection calls in ruby. Thus this line:

x.send :[]=,0,2

Is equivalent to:

x[0] = 2

you read it that way: the name of the method is symbol (in your case []=) and then you pass in the parameters - 0 and 2.

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x[0]+x[1]+x[2]=2+2+3=7 i guess this must be the answer

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